My Name Is Lucy Barton by Elizabeth Strout

My Name is Lucy Barton
My Name Is Lucy Barton

by
Elizabeth Strout

Rating:
3 book marks1 half bookmark

How do you put the hushed experiences of your childhood into words?  Should you?  Does recreating oneself and assimilating into New York’s diverse population give you enough distance to promise happiness?  Lucy Barton, narrator in Elizabeth Strout’s most recent novel, My Name Is Lucy Barton, tries to do these things as she reflects on her family, marriage and friendships.

In her narration, Lucy tries to explain her evolution as a fiction writer.  She talks about her past, particularly a period of her life in the 1980s, when she was hospitalized for nine weeks for an unidentified infection.  Her mother, whom she hasn’t seen for years, boards a plane for the first time and travels from Amgash, Illinois to be with Lucy.  She provides an unexpected comfort.

Her being there, using my pet name, which I had not heard in ages, made me feel warm and liquid-filled, as though all my tension had been a solid thing and now was not.

Not a surprising reaction, until Lucy tells about a lonely childhood, growing up hopelessly poor and living in a garage until she was twelve.  She’s estranged from her father, who suffers from a traumatic war experience in Germany.  Other unnamed events haunt Lucy and her brother and sister, who coped in their own ways.

As they pass the time in the hospital, however, Lucy and her mother connect through her mother’s stories about other people in Amgash.  This opportunity to become mother and daughter is not completely fulfilled, however, because they only dance around the tough subjects.

Lucy’s story moves between her time in the hospital, her childhood and marriage, bringing the reader to the present in the final pages of the book.  A chance meeting with a popular fiction writer makes her wonder about her own career.  The writer tells Lucy’s writing class, “You will have only one story.  You’ll write your one story many ways.  Don’t ever worry about story.  You have only one.”

I’m not sure I completely understand this book.  It’s extremely readable, but for someone who likes to know the facts, it’s also frustrating.  Everything in the story is vague:  Lucy’s illness, her past, her relationships, her marriage.  I had a hard time getting a grip on the message.  What’s probably the point is how nearly impossible it is to understand relationships and how hard it is to talk about painful memories.  Maybe the only way to do that is forget the past and connect in any way you can, as Lucy does in the hospital with her mother and when she returns to Amgash for the last time.

The only solid relationship in the story is between Lucy and her doctor, who becomes a father figure to her, yet Strout deliberately leaves him unnamed and he fades from Lucy’s life once she leaves the hospital.  I wanted to know more about this character.

The danger of a fast read is in missing important themes.  I may have to re-read this one to understand it better.  Have you read Lucy Barton?  What was your reaction?


Note:  Summer is over, but I’m still reading my Summer Reading Challenge books!  Take a look at my choices for the 16 in 16 Challenge:

Book 1 – A Book You Can Finish in a Day:  The Good Neighbor by A.J. Banner
Book 2 – A Book in a Genre You Typically Don’t Read:  The Ghost Map by Steven Johnson
Book 3 – A Book with a Blue Cover:  The Vacationers by Emma Straub
Book 4 – A Book Translated to English:  I Refuse by Per Petterson
Book 5 – A Second Book in a Series:  Brooklyn on Fire by Lawrence H. Levy
Book 6 – A Book To Learn Something New: The Beginner’s Photography Guide by Chris Gatcum
Book 7 – A Book That Was Banned:  The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian by Sherman Alexie
Book 8 – A Book Set Somewhere You’ve Always Wanted to Visit:  Calmer Girls by Jennifer Kelland Perry
Book 9 – A Book with Non-human Characters:  The Ocean at the End of the Lane by Neil Gaiman
Book 10 – A Book Recommended by a Librarian:  Brooklyn by Colm Tóibín
Book 11 – A Book Being Made into a Movie this Year:  A Monster Calls by Patrick Ness
Book 12 – A Book with Bad Reviews:  The Awakening by Kate Chopin
Book 13 – A Book Written the Year You Were Born:  Onion John by Joseph Krumgold
Book 14 – A Book Written by Someone Under 30 /Over 70: The Beginner’s Goodbye by Anne Tyler
Book 15 – A Book “Everyone” Has Read but You:  My Name Is Lucy Barton by Elizabeth Strout
Book 16 – A Book Chosen for You by Your Spouse, Partner, Sibling, Child or BFF:

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11 thoughts on “My Name Is Lucy Barton by Elizabeth Strout

    1. The more I think about it the more I believe she did it to make a point. I didn’t study other reviews to know, but I think other readers may find it frustrating. I guess it’s a matter of preference. Thanks for reading and commenting, Stephanie!

    1. Hi Ann, well yes I was a little surprised at how vague it was, but I’m sure there’s a message in that. Elizabeth Strout is such a great writer and I blew through this. I’m thinking it needs a second read.

  1. Great review and I was hooked from the beginning – the cover alone is terrific and such a absorbing premise. However, your reservations are understandable and just vagueness would annoy me in the long run in a book…might give it a go if I come across it though.

    1. Hi Annika – Strout is an excellent writer and the book is very readable. It’s a quick story too. I’m glad I read it, I just am not sure of what it means! Thanks for commenting.

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