American history, Pilgrim marriages and a Thanksgiving memory

Image: Pixabay

Thanksgiving is fast approaching and, although here in the U.S. we are about to enter one of the busiest times of the year, it’s always good to take time to learn the history of our early American settlers, how the Thanksgiving holiday really came about and remember the important family moments that make contemporary holidays meaningful.


Mayflower by Nathaniel Philbrick

Do you think you know all about the Mayflower? Check out Nathaniel Philbrick’s comprehensive and scholarly account that begins with Mayflower’s voyage in 1620 and ends with the conclusion of King Philip’s War in 1676. These 102 Separatists and Non-Separatists struggled to survive when they arrived in Plymouth and did anything they could to keep from starving or freezing to death. Made up of printers and weavers and other tradesmen, women and children, they were woefully unprepared for the desperate conditions that killed nearly half of them in the first year.


Guest Post – Noelle Granger “A Little History of Pilgrim Husbands and Wives”

ushistoryimages.com

Noelle Granger, author of the Rhe Brewster Mystery Series, has some great ideas for her first historical novel, based on the early Plimoth Colony. In this guest post, Noelle talks about her idea and about the history of Pilgrim marriages.


Thanksgiving Memories When You’re Small

When you are little, the large holiday picture is not yet in view. The small memories make the biggest impressions. One of mine is sitting on my mother’s lap at the Thanksgiving table and playing with her gold bracelet.


What are your Thanksgiving traditions and special memories?

Thanks for visiting – come back soon!

7 thoughts on “American history, Pilgrim marriages and a Thanksgiving memory

  1. Oh I love this post! I want to read Mayflower. I do like him as an author and enjoy his writing. When it comes to memories, I just remember rising to the wonderful smells coming from the kitchen, the parade, and putting up Christmas decorations which we still do every year. I love traditions. Really excited about the holidays this year! Great post. ❤🧡❤

  2. Thanks for the post. You might also like “Wordy Shipmates” by the very smart and amusing Sarah Vowel. My favirite part of Thanksgiving growing up was the huge gathering with all my cousins and the array of pies. The standard solution to all the choices was, “A sliver of each, please.”

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