Book Review: The Cutting Season by Attica Locke

The Cutting Season
by
Attica Locke

Rating: 4 out of 5.

I always enjoy new fiction, but I also love when I discover an excellent older book. I’m not talking about classics, but more recent books I missed when they were first published.  The Cutting Season was published in 2012 and although it’s a suspenseful murder mystery, I’d also describe it as literature with well-developed characters and themes.

Set in 2009 Louisiana on Belle Vie, a former sugar cane plantation turned tourist attraction and wedding venue, Locke tells the story of four generations connected to Belle Vie and ties together two murders, over a hundred years apart. Caren Gray, the main character, grew up on the plantation, owned by the Clancy family and where, her mother, Helen was the cook. Their family traces back to Caren’s great-great-great-grandfather, Jason, a slave worker who mysteriously disappeared in 1872. Now Caren manages Belle Vie, including a staff of re-enactors who play the roles of slaves. The grounds are limited to the land adjacent to the cane fields. Groveland Farms leases the fields and, instead of employing locals, hires immigrant workers from Mexico and Central America.

Although Belle Vie is not far from New Orleans and Baton Rouge, Caren leads an isolated life on the property where she’s raising her nine-year-old daughter, Morgan Ellis. Caren returned to Belle Vie in 2005, after Hurricane Katrina and a crumbling relationship with Morgan’s father, Eric. The couple had met during law school, but Caren was unable to finish.

The story opens when a Belle Vie maintenance worker discovers the body of Inés Avalo, a Groveland employee. Her body was found along the inside of the fence that divides Belle Vie and the leased land. Detectives immediately suspect one of the re-enactors, Donovan Isaacs, who has mysteriously disappeared.

Also at play is the Clancy family: Leland and his sons Raymond and Bobby, who fell into ownership when a Clancy ancestor acquired the plantation after the Civil War. When Leland ran Belle Vie, during which time Caren and Leland’s sons grew up, he made sure to do his part to correct the injustices against blacks. Bobby, for unknown reasons, is out of the picture and Raymond now runs Belle Vie. He’s counting on his father’s legacy to help his political aspirations.

Caren feels a complex connection to Belle Vie, as do all the people who work there. Some have family ties to the place, but the young players, including Donovan, are still learning Belle Vie’s history. She’s also uneasy around Raymond, who still reminds her of his position of authority. Bobby had always been her favorite and Caren wonders about Raymond when Bobby returns to warn her about his money-grubbing brother.

Not just a suspenseful mystery, this is a story about how an ugly period of American history fits into a modern setting and how its characters deal with their own history and its connection to slavery. Should places like Belle Vie continue to exist to educate new generations, or are they just glossy versions of a shameful period?

Thanks for visiting—come back soon!

For more Attica Lock, check out my review of Bluebird, Bluebird.

25 thoughts on “Book Review: The Cutting Season by Attica Locke

  1. Thanks for the review. I feel the same way about these authors, Anne Tyler and Elizabeth Berg–oldies but goodies, comfort food, not necessarily mysteries.

    1. Thank you, Lynette – I love that kind of book. Hope you are doing well. I’ve had a crazy busy schedule with work and travel but I’ll be on the blog soon. 🙂

    1. Hi Noelle – yes, “Locke was born in Houston, Texas, to parents who were active in the civil rights movement at the turn of the 1970s and who named her after the 1971 Attica Prison rebellion.” This is from Wikipedia! Thank you for stopping by. 🙂

    1. Thank you, Robbie – I appreciate it. Hope you are doing well. I’ve been super busy again with work and travel. By next week, all will have settled down.

    1. Thank you, Donna. I love when I can recommend a book – not everything fits in that category but I’m on a roll. Hope you are doing well – I will be over soon 🙂

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