Book Review: The Flatshare by Beth O’Leary

The Flatshare
by
Beth O’Leary

Rating:

Tiffy Moore owes money and is short on cash. And she needs to get out of her ex-boyfriend’s place as soon as possible. Leon Twomey has an apartment and also needs money. To earn extra cash, he’s been working the night shift as a palliative nurse, but how to get more? Why not rent out his apartment while he’s at work? That should work, right?

Tiffy has looked everywhere and when she sees the ad for Leon’s place, she thinks this unusual arrangement just might work. Since she works days at a publishing company, they could share the apartment and never even meet. One tricky part is that the flat is so small that they will also be sharing a bed, at different times, of course.

That’s the premise of this cute romantic story, about two people who aren’t looking to get together and must learn what to do when the sparks fly.

The story takes place in London and is told from both characters’ points of view. They get to know each other through running conversations on Post-It notes, stuck in various places in the flat. For me, this is the best part of the story. The notes are clever and fun and reveal their personalities as they become more comfortable telling each other about themselves.

But they both have problems and emotional baggage and these back stories slowly come out, making The Flatshare more than just a fluffy story. And while readers know they are in for a romance, it’s not clear how Tiffy and Leon will get over the many hurdles they encounter.

I enjoyed this story because of its pure entertainment value. The characters are likable, modern and fun. While the plot is improbable and sometimes silly, there’s no harm in giving in to a story like this. I can picture The Flatshare as a romantic comedy film.

I recommend The Flatshare to readers who are looking for a quick romantic story, with a little spice.

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Book Review: Blue Monday by Nicci French

Blue Monday
by
Nicci French

Rating: 5 out of 5.

Before I tell you why I loved this terrific book, I want to give you a little background about the novel and the authors. Published in 2011 and set in London, Blue Monday is the first in a series of eight mystery thrillers featuring Frieda Klein, a highly regarded psychoanalyst who, in this story, becomes entangled in a kidnapping investigation. Nicci French is the pseudonym for married suspense writers, Nicci Gerrard and Sean French. Together they have written over twenty books. You can find out more about Nicci French and the Frieda Klein series here.

Blue Monday’s story begins with Alan Dekker, one of Klein’s patients, who is tormented by disturbing recurring dreams of a young boy. Dekker is desperate to have a son of his own and the boy in his dreams eerily resembles recently kidnapped five-year-old Matthew Faraday. What’s the connection?

“This is the place where you’re allowed to say anything. There are no limits,” she tells Dekker. But is that really the case? In no time, Frieda finds herself in the middle of the investigation, led by Chief Inspector Malcolm Karlsson. He wonders if Matthew’s disappearance is related to a similar kidnapping twenty years earlier. A concrete evidence detective, he must then rely on Klein’s unconventional methods, and giving into her ideas may take them down the wrong path.

Getting to know Klein is not an easy task. Only happy when in control, professionally and personally, she relies on long late-night walks through deserted London neighborhoods to clear her head. Readers get to know her as she manages relationships with several secondary characters, including Sandy, a new love interest who wants a bigger commitment.

One of the things I enjoyed about Blue Monday is that it is a character-driven mystery. The authors’ characters are both interesting and complex, with their own sets of problems. They give the reader plenty to think about as they come into contact with what I’ll call the authors’ mood influencers: the dark London streets, deserted neighborhoods, gray fog and mist, all connected by the various rivers that run into and through the River Thames. In addition, I especially liked reading about Klein’s apartment, a safe spot she fiercely protects against intrusion.

I won’t spoil the story by revealing the authors’ clever and changing plot development. Twists and turns to the very last pages make Blue Monday a highly entertaining book. Some hanging details and a whopper development at the finish set the scene for the next book, Tuesday’s Gone. I’m looking forward to working my way through this series.

I recommend Blue Monday to readers who enjoy interesting characters and the challenge of unraveling a smart mystery.

And what’s the meaning behind the book’s title, Blue Monday? It “is about beginnings but also about the difficulty of beginning, its pains and regrets and fears. It also happens to be the title of two (very different) great songs—by Fats Domino and New Order,” explain the authors. (Read the full interview at penguinrandomhouse.com.)

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