How deep is your reading list?

Image: Pixabay

There’s something exciting about finishing a book and thinking about what to read next. I’ve gotten a little ahead of myself this month, though, because now I have a mini stack of books to be read. It’s not a bad problem to have. Even when I’m in a bit of a time crunch, I always relax while I’m reading. It’s my escape!

Here’s a peek at what’s coming up:


Last Stop in Brooklyn:  A Mary Handley Mystery by Lawrence H. Levy

I know this is going to be a fun read and I can’t wait to start. This is the third book in the Mary Handley historical mystery series, featuring New York’s first female detective. For all you NetGalley readers, Last Stop in Brooklyn is up and ready to go!

And if you want to start at the beginning, click on the links below to learn more about the first two books in the series:

Second Street Station
Brooklyn on Fire


Verdict of Twelve by Raymond Postgate

I read about this on Cleopatra Loves Books and knew I wanted to read it! Originally published in 1940, it’s part of the British Library Crime Classics collection and follows a jury’s intense deliberation. At 237 pages, it’s a shorter read, something good to read between the bigger books.


Another Brooklyn by Jacqueline Woodson

My ladies book club is reading this for our December meeting. This is another short one, published in 2016. It’s about a group of friends in 1970s Brooklyn and sounds great, perfect to read during the busy holiday season. We’ll be chatting about this one while we celebrate the holidays with our annual book exchange.


 Seven Ways We Lie by Riley Redgate

You see a lot of books when you work in a library and this one caught my eye. It’s a Young Adult book about high school kids, friendship, scandals and lies. Redgate wrote this as a senior economics major at Kenyon College and it is her first novel.


 The Secrets of Wishtide by Kate Saunders

Our mystery book club at work has chosen this one for December, the first in `The Laetitia Rodd Mysteries’, six novels featuring a Victorian lady detective. Here’s what Amazon has to say:

The Secrets of Wishtide brings nineteenth century society vividly to life and illuminates the effect of Victorian morality on women’s lives. Introducing an irresistible new detective, the first book in the Laetitia Rodd Mystery series will enthrall and delight.”


David Bowie:  A Life by Dylan Jones

This biography came to me from NetGalley and I’m looking forward to it because of Bowie’s music and my high school memories, including one of my friend singing “Changes” in Algebra II and hanging out in the cool crowd’s “Bowie Room” one night.


I’m ready to go with this nice mix of books, including a couple to add to my New York Books list!

So what about you? What’s on your December list?

Thanks for visiting – come back soon!

The Pulitzer Prize for Fiction – how many have you read?

Someday I’d like to say I have read all the Pulitzer Prize winners for fiction. I took a look at the all-time list, and discovered I have a long way to go!

2019: The Overstory by Richard Powers

2018: Less by Andrew Sean Greer (read and reviewed)

2017:  The Underground Railroad by Colson Whitehead

2016:  The Sympathizer by Viet Thanh Nguyen

2015:  All the Light We Cannot See by Anthony Doerr (read and reviewed)

2014:  The Goldfinch by Donna Tartt

2013:  The Orphan Master’s Son by Adam Johnson

2012:  No award

2011:  A Visit from the Goon Squad by Jennifer Egan

2010:  Tinkers by Paul Harding

2009:  Olive Kitteridge by Elizabeth Strout (read and reviewed)

2008:  The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao by Junot Diaz

2007:  The Road by Cormac McCarthy (read and reviewed)

2006:  March by Geraldine Brooks

2005:  Gilead by Marilynne Robinson

2004:  The Known World by Edward P. Jones

2003:  Middlesex by Jeffrey Eugenides (read but not reviewed)

2002:  Empire Falls by Richard Russo (read and reviewed)

2001:  The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier & Clay by Michael Chabon

2000:  Interpreter of Maladies by Jhumpa Lahiri

1999:  The Hours by Michael Cunningham (read but not reviewed)

1998:  American Pastoral by Philip Roth

1997:  Martin Dressler: The Tale of an American Dreamer by Steven Millhauser

1996:  Independence Day by Richard Ford

1995:  The Stone Diaries by Carol Shields

1994:  The Shipping News by E. Annie Proulx (read but not reviewed)

1993:  A Good Scent from a Strange Mountain by Robert Olen Butler

1992:  A Thousand Acres by Jane Smiley

1991:  Rabbit At Rest by John Updike

1990:  The Mambo Kings Play Songs of Love by Oscar Hijuelos

1989:  Breathing Lessons by Anne Tyler

1988:  Beloved by Toni Morrison (read but not reviewed)

1987:  A Summons to Memphis by Peter Taylor

1986:  Lonesome Dove by Larry McMurtry

1985:  Foreign Affairs by Alison Lurie

1984:  Ironweed by William Kennedy

1983:  The Color Purple by Alice Walker (read but not reviewed)

1982:  Rabbit Is Rich by John Updike

1981:  A Confederacy of Dunces by John Kennedy Toole

1980:  The Executioner’s Song by Norman Mailer

1979:  The Stories of John Cheever by John Cheever

1978:  Elbow Room by James Alan McPherson

1977:  No award

1976:  Humboldt’s Gift by Saul Bellow

1975:  The Killer Angels by Michael Shaara

1974:  No award

1973:  The Optimist’s Daughter by Eudora Welty (read but not reviewed) 

1972:  Angle of Repose by Wallace Stegner

1971:  No award

1970:  Collected Stories by Jean Stafford

1969:  House Made of Dawn by N. Scott Momaday

1968:  The Confessions of Nat Turner by William Styron

1967:  The Fixer by Bernard Malamud

1966:  Collected Stories by Katherine Anne Porter

1965:  The Keepers Of The House by Shirley Ann Grau

1964:  No award

1963:  The Reivers by William Faulkner

1962:  The Edge of Sadness by Edwin O’Connor

1961:  To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee (read and reviewed)

1960:  Advise and Consent by Allen Drury

1959:  The Travels of Jaimie McPheeters by Robert Lewis Taylor

1958:  A Death In The Family by James Agee

1957:  No award

1956:  Andersonville by MacKinlay Kantor

1955:  A Fable by William Faulkner

1954:  No award

1953:  The Old Man and the Sea by Ernest Hemingway (read and reviewed)

1952:  The Caine Mutiny by Herman Wouk

1951:  The Town by Conrad Richter

1950:  The Way West by A. B. Guthrie

1949:  Guard of Honor by James Gould Cozzens

1948:  Tales of the South Pacific by James A. Michener


Note – prior to 1948, the awards were split between Novel and Drama. The following winners are from the Novel category


1947:  All the King’s Men by Robert Penn Warren

1946:  No award

1945:  A Bell for Adano by John Hersey

1944:  Journey in the Dark by Martin Flavin

1943:  Dragon’s Teeth by Upton Sinclair

1942:  In This Our Life by Ellen Glasgow

1941:  No award

1940:  The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck (read and reviewed)

1939:  The Yearling by Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings (read but not reviewed)

1938:  The Late George Apley by John Phillips Marquand

1937:  Gone With the Wind by Margaret Mitchell (read and reviewed)

1936:  Honey in the Horn by Harold L. Davis

1935:  Now in November by Josephine Winslow Johnson

1934:  Lamb in His Bosom by Caroline Miller

1933:  The Store by T. S. Stribling

1932:  The Good Earth by Pearl S. Buck (read but not reviewed)

1931:  Years of Grace by Margaret Ayer Barnes

1930:  Laughing Boy by Oliver Lafarge

1929:  Scarlet Sister Mary by Julia Peterkin

1928:  The Bridge of San Luis Rey by Thornton Wilder

1927:  Early Autumn by Louis Bromfield

1926:  Arrowsmith by Sinclair Lewis

1925:  So Big by Edna Ferber

1924:  The Able McLaughlins by Margaret Wilson

1923:  One of Ours by Willa Cather

1922:  Alice Adams by Booth Tarkington

1921:  The Age of Innocence by Edith Wharton (read and reviewed)

1920:  No award

1919:  The Magnificent Ambersons by Booth Tarkington

1918:  His Family by Ernest Poole


To reward you for making it to the bottom of this list, here are a few facts about the Pulitzer Prizes!

  • The Pulitzer prizes were established in 1917 to recognize outstanding journalism, photography, literature, history, poetry, music and drama.
  • There are twenty-one award categories. Only United States citizens are eligible to apply for the prize in Letters, Drama and Music, except for the History category of Letters, in which the book must be about the United States, but the author may be of any nationality.
  • John F. Kennedy has been the only President to receive the Pulitzer Prize. He was awarded the prize in 1957 for his biography, Profiles in Courage.
  • And for all those self-published and indie authors: Self-published books are eligible for the prize, but they must be available in print!
Image: Wikipedia

Click here to visit an earlier post with interesting facts about the man behind it all, famous newspaper publisher Joseph Pulitzer.

Visit pulitzer.org to learn more about the Pulitzer Prizes.

Thanks for visiting – come back soon!