Book Review: Near Prospect Park by Lawrence H. Levy

Near Prospect Park
by
Lawrence H. Levy

In Near Prospect Park, Brooklyn detective Mary Handley takes on New York’s upper crust as she works with Lillian Russell, Diamond Jim Brady and Teddy Roosevelt to solve her husband’s murder.

It’s 1895 and Mary is happily married to Harper Lloyd, an investigative journalist. Despite also caring for their baby daughter, Mary still has her feet in detective work. For Mary is a modern woman, unwilling to sacrifice her ambition and independence to society’s (and her opinionated mother’s) expectations.

William S. Gilbert (of the comic opera team Gilbert and Sullivan) has hired Mary to help him retrieve a ransomed manuscript and, with four thousand in cash, Mary agrees to make the exchange with the thief in Prospect Park. But the meeting goes wrong and in the shocking aftermath, Mary discovers that Harper has been murdered. Fueled on grief and rage, Mary sets out to find his killer.

Mary first turns to her contacts in the Gilbert case, who include actress Lillian Russell and railroad supplies magnate Diamond Jim Brady. Through them, she soon becomes acquainted with blue blood bad boys Stanford White and James Breese. White, a famous architect and photographer and financier Breese have been linked to a raucous party in which fifteen-year-old Susie Johnson was hired to jump out of a pie. Johnson’s claims of rape were largely quashed by the powerful elite. But Mary has not forgotten the scandal of the Pie Girl Dinner and, despite investigating Harper’s murder, she knows she must also get to the bottom of this atrocious behavior. Teddy Roosevelt, president of the New York police commissioners and a strong supporter of women’s rights, also has Mary’s back.

Mary is a risk-taker, but a confident one, for she is a master in jujitsu and she has flattened many foes with her quick moves. She will need these skills as she digs deeper into the case.

I enjoyed this fast-moving and entertaining historical mystery. As in his earlier books, the author includes many historical figures and brings their personalities to life. New York in the 1890s was a rough place, especially for women. The Pie Girl Dinner, an actual event, is just one example of how crimes against women are nothing new.

As in the earlier Mary Handley Mysteries, Near Prospect Park is an enjoyable mystery that incorporates humor into serious themes. Mary’s character is strong, yet vulnerable, making her relatable, even in modern times. I’m looking forward to more Mary Handley adventures!

Want more? Check out these other Mary Handley Mysteries.

Second Street Station (Book 1)
Brooklyn on Fire (Book 2)
Last Stop in Brooklyn (Book 3)

Author Interview – Lawrence H. Levy

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On blogging and menu pages

If you’re interested in seeing what I’ve read since the beginning of Book Club Mom, check out the yearly “Books of…” in the top menu. Here’s a quick run-down of them:


Books of 2013

Book Club Mom was born in 2013. Understanding blogging takes a while and learning how to write proper book reviews takes even longer. So this was the year of figuring it out. But I read a lot in 2013. Classics, new books, Young Adult and several random books. And some terrific 5-star reads, including Gone With the WindThe Giver, To Kill a Mockingbird and Life After Life.


Books of 2014

This year I read a lot of short fiction and re-read some of my favorite children’s books. I also mixed it up with my favorite classics – Jane Eyre, The Great Gatsby, Breakfast at Tiffany’s and Lord of the Flies, a wildly popular book of the time, Me Before You, and one of my favorite reads of the year, The Interestings.

And 2014 was also the year when I re-read my all-time favorite book, Youngblood Hawke!


Books of 2015

This year I read a variety of genres, including short fiction, and dipped into some nonfiction. I remember loving The Sound and the Fury when I was in college, but I had a hard time getting through it this time! I re-read one of my favorites, The Grapes of Wrath and read Julius Caesar because one of my kids was reading it in school.

I had never read Slaughterhouse Five and was blown away by it. What a book! And of course, All the Light We Cannot See was an unforgettable story. Some popular books and some fun ones rounded out the year.


Books of 2016

This year I did two things that were different. I started writing articles based on books I’d read for a website. And I got a job in a public library. I did my first summer reading challenge which had me reading different types of books. I also renewed my interest in thrillers and historical fiction. I went on a Hemingway kick and reread A Farewell to Arms, The Old Man and the Sea and read A Moveable Feast for the first time. And this was the year I read some great indie and self-published books, including Eating Bull by Carrie and Calmer Girls by Jennifer Kelland Perry.  Some nonfiction rounded things out, including The Ghost Map, which one of my kids had to read for his freshman seminar in college.


Books of 2017

2017 was a different year because I started to get more into thrillers. It’s fun to mix them in to other types of books. I also started helping out with the Whodunits Mystery Book Club at the library where I work, so I took up mysteries. That’s a genre I hadn’t read much of before and I read some excellent ones like Crooked Letter, Crooked Letter and The Lewis Trilogy, which is set in the Outer Hebrides of Scotland. I did our library’s summer reading challenge again and read some different books, like The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin and Black Beauty.

I also read two books by my author friends, The Seneca Scourge by Carrie Rubin (don’t read this on an airplane! 😬) and Calmer Secrets by Jennifer Kelland Perry, a great sequel to Calmer Girls.


Books of 2018

2018 was the year I started listening to audiobooks. I’d never tried them and wanted to “hear” what they were all about. Although I still prefer reading books, I found that listening to audiobooks was a fun way to pass the time while I was walking or doing things around the house. I learned, however, not to listen while I was cooking because of a measuring incident while listening to a thriller!

I read some excellent nonfiction this year, including Killers of the Flower Moon, Educated and Let’s Pretend This Never Happened. And I continued to enjoy several of my blogging/writing friends’ books, including The Bone Curse by Carrie Rubin, The Storyteller Speaks by Annika Perry, Second Chance Romance by Jill Weatherholt and Death in a Mudflat by Noelle Granger.


Books of 2019

2019 was a great reading year. I listened to more audiobooks, read mysteries for work, and talked more with my work friends about what books were hot, which led to me reading (and listening to) Long Way Down and What If? and reading Lab Girl and The Beneficiary. I read a few debut books that became really hot during the year, The Silent Patient and Miracle Creek.

Several 5-star reads included In Cold Blood, Less and Where the Crawdads Sing.


Books of 2020

Just getting started!


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Mysteries and thrillers to keep you guessing

Image: Pixabay

I read some good mysteries and thrillers this year, some debuts and others by established authors. Great for seasoned readers of this genre and everyone in between! Take a look:


Back of Beyond by C. J. Box

Tense murder mystery set in Yellowstone National Park, with a suspended investigator on the heels of a wildnerness adventure tour, sure his son is in danger.


Bluebird, Bluebird by Attica Locke

A conflicted Texas Ranger is in hot water with the force for helping out a family friend facing murder charges. Forced to turn in his badge, he goes rogue with a new investigation.


A Duty to the Dead by Charles Todd

Entertaining historical mystery, set in England during World War I. The first book of the Bess Crawford Mysteries, introducing Bess as a highly skilled young nurse aboard the doomed HMHS Britannic.


The Escape Room by Megan Goldin

When Vincent deVries of Stanhope & Sons summons his Wall Street investment banker team to a compulsory meeting, the last thing they expect is to be trapped in an elevator, meant to be the setting for an escape room activity.


Frog Music by Emma Donoghue

Fictionalized account of the 1876 murder of Jenny Bonnet, an enigmatic free spirit in San Francisco, who dressed like a man and earned a living catching frogs for restaurants.


The Glass Room by Ann Cleeves

Detective Inspector Vera Stanhope has another crime to solve when her neighbor, Joanna Tobin, goes missing and an influential professor is murdered. Could Joanna, who is off her meds, be responsible for the professor’s death?


Miracle Creek by Angie Kim

Debut novel and a mystery/courtroom drama in which a young mother stands trial for the murder of her 8-year-old autistic son.


The Silent Patient by Alex Michaelides

Alicia Berenson does something strange after she kills her husband. She stops talking. The only clue to explain her actions is a self-portrait, painted a few days after the murder.


Those People by Louise Candlish

On the problem of despicable neighbors, here’s a new book about a couple that moves into an idyllic and award-winning neighborhood in South London and drives the families to desperation.


What the Dead Know by Laura Lippman

It’s 1975 when two sisters disappear from a busy mall outside Baltimore, Maryland. They separate at the mall and never come home. Thirty years later, a mysterious woman returns and claims to be one of the missing girls.


Did you read any good mysteries or thrillers this year?

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Summer reading sum-up

The best part about reading challenges is that they shake up your shelf. You may say you’re going to read a certain genre or try an audio book, but do you? A bingo card that promises a chance to win a raffle is a great motivator!

Our library’s summer reading challenge is coming to a close and I’m ready to turn in my bingo card. I didn’t fill all the squares, but I got a bingo. I also read and did some new things. Maybe I’ll win a prize!

Here’s a rundown of the squares I filled:

Listen to an audio book: Pretty Girls by Karin Slaughter
Read a children’s classic: The Secret Garden by Frances Hodgson Burnett
Choose a book because you like its cover: Hope Never Dies by Andrew Shaffer
Read a book set within the past 20 years: Death in a Mudflat by N.A. Granger
Read a book about a musician: David Bowie – A Life by Dylan Jones
Read or listen to any book you choose: Stillhouse Lake by Rachel Caine
Read a book in a genre you don’t usually read: Second Chance Romance by Jill Weatherholt
Read a book you own but haven’t read: Miller’s Valley by Anna Quindlen
Read a book set in a place you’d like to visit: The Dry by Jane Harper
Read a book suggested by a librarian: Andy Warhol Was a Hoarder by Claudia Kalb

I also did some fun activities!

Watch a movie based on a book: The Martian starring Matt Damon
Check out and listen to a music CD: Louis Prima – His Greatest Hits
Read a magazine on our library’s online service, Flipster: Good Housekeeping
Submit a review for a book you read this summer: David Bowie – A Life by Dylan Jones

And my favorite, because look at this cool leaf I made:

Attend a program at your library: Leaf Casting Workshop – (read how here)

This is a magnolia leaf. I’ll be painting and sealing it next month!


How was your summer? Did you do any challenges? What did you read?

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Who’s That Indie Author? K.C. Tansley

whos-that-indie-author

Author name:  K.C. Tansley

Genre:  YA Time Travel Mysteries

Books:  The Girl Who Ignored Ghosts, The Girl Who Saved Ghosts

    

Bio:  K.C Tansley lives with her warrior lapdog, Emerson, and two quirky golden retrievers on a hill somewhere in Connecticut. She tends to believe in the unbelievables–spells, ghosts, time travel–and writes about them.

Never one to say no to a road trip, she’s climbed the Great Wall twice, hopped on the Sound of Music tour in Salzburg, and danced the night away in the dunes of Cape Hatteras. She loves the ocean and hates the sun, which makes for interesting beach days.

As Kourtney Heintz, she also writes award winning cross-genre fiction for adults.

Favorite thing about being a writer:  Nailing an emotional beat. After struggling with a scene for weeks, there’s usually a moment when it all comes together and I feel like I’ll hit the readers with just the right mix of visceral reactions, internal thoughts, and body language for them to experience what my character feels.

Biggest challenge as an indie author:  Selling books remains the hardest part of being an indie author.

Favorite booksCity of Glass by Cassandra Clare, The Fault in Our Stars by John Green, Last Sacrifice by Richelle Mead, Splintered by A.G. Howard, Daughter of Smoke and Bone by Laini Taylor

Contact Information:  Website: kourtneyheintz.com
Blog: blog.kourtneyheintz.com
Facebook: @kourtneyheintzwriter
Twitter: @KourHei

Awards/special recognition:   The Girl Who Ignored Ghosts (Book 1 of The Unbelievables)

  • 2017 EPIC’s Ariana Cover Design Awards Finalist
  • 2017 EPIC’s Ebook Award Finalist
  • 2016 Moonbeam Children’s Book Awards Gold Winner
  • 2016 Killer Nashville Silver Falchion Judges’ Choice Awards Winner
  • 2016 National Indie Excellence Awards Finalist
  • 2016 International Book Awards Finalist
  • 2015 Readers’ Favorite International Book Awards Finalist

Are you an indie author?  Do you want to build your indie author network? Get your name out on Who’s That Indie Author!

Email bvitelli2009@gmail.com for a bio template and other details.

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How deep is your reading list?

Image: Pixabay

There’s something exciting about finishing a book and thinking about what to read next. I’ve gotten a little ahead of myself this month, though, because now I have a mini stack of books to be read. It’s not a bad problem to have. Even when I’m in a bit of a time crunch, I always relax while I’m reading. It’s my escape!

Here’s a peek at what’s coming up:


Last Stop in Brooklyn:  A Mary Handley Mystery by Lawrence H. Levy

I know this is going to be a fun read and I can’t wait to start. This is the third book in the Mary Handley historical mystery series, featuring New York’s first female detective. For all you NetGalley readers, Last Stop in Brooklyn is up and ready to go!

And if you want to start at the beginning, click on the links below to learn more about the first two books in the series:

Second Street Station
Brooklyn on Fire


Verdict of Twelve by Raymond Postgate

I read about this on Cleopatra Loves Books and knew I wanted to read it! Originally published in 1940, it’s part of the British Library Crime Classics collection and follows a jury’s intense deliberation. At 237 pages, it’s a shorter read, something good to read between the bigger books.


Another Brooklyn by Jacqueline Woodson

My ladies book club is reading this for our December meeting. This is another short one, published in 2016. It’s about a group of friends in 1970s Brooklyn and sounds great, perfect to read during the busy holiday season. We’ll be chatting about this one while we celebrate the holidays with our annual book exchange.


 Seven Ways We Lie by Riley Redgate

You see a lot of books when you work in a library and this one caught my eye. It’s a Young Adult book about high school kids, friendship, scandals and lies. Redgate wrote this as a senior economics major at Kenyon College and it is her first novel.


 The Secrets of Wishtide by Kate Saunders

Our mystery book club at work has chosen this one for December, the first in `The Laetitia Rodd Mysteries’, six novels featuring a Victorian lady detective. Here’s what Amazon has to say:

The Secrets of Wishtide brings nineteenth century society vividly to life and illuminates the effect of Victorian morality on women’s lives. Introducing an irresistible new detective, the first book in the Laetitia Rodd Mystery series will enthrall and delight.”


David Bowie:  A Life by Dylan Jones

This biography came to me from NetGalley and I’m looking forward to it because of Bowie’s music and my high school memories, including one of my friend singing “Changes” in Algebra II and hanging out in the cool crowd’s “Bowie Room” one night.


I’m ready to go with this nice mix of books, including a couple to add to my New York Books list!

So what about you? What’s on your December list?

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A Great Reckoning by Louise Penny

A Great Reckoning
by
Louise Penny

Rating:

After a deadly hostage situation, Former Chief Inspector Armand Gamache has taken early retirement from the Sûreté du Québec. He’s regrouping in the cozy village of Three Pines with his wife Reine-Marie while he prepares for his new job:  Commander of the Sûreté Academy. There’s been a bad batch of cadets from the police academy, not to mention a corrupt administration, and Gamache is determined to clean house. While some get the axe, new professors are hired, including his boyhood friend, Michel Brébeuf.

Brébeuf is no friend now, however. Their bond shattered after Brébeuf’s unforgivable betrayal while at the Sûreté. Gamache also decides to keep Serge Leduc, formerly second in command at the academy and rumored to be the cruelest and most corrupt at the school. Many are nervous about the changes and wonder, is Gamache doing the right thing?

Classes begin and the cadets and professors settle into the new regime, but it isn’t long before a shocking murder upends the academy. Investigating the murder are Chief Inspector Isabelle Lacoste and an outsider, Deputy Commissioner Paul Gélinas from the Royal Canadian Mounted Police.

Authorities rule out no one, including Gamache and four cadets, who have been researching a mysterious map found in the wall of the Three Pines bistro. Their relationships and personal histories make an excellent second story and I enjoyed seeing how Penny explains their motives and ties them into the mystery. As the story develops, evidence seems to implicate one of the students, the tattooed and pierced Amelia Choquet, and before long, many questions arise about her relationship with Gamache.

Published in 2016, A Great Reckoning is one of Louise Penny’s more recent Armand Gamache mysteries, a very readable and entertaining story. While it’s clear the characters have a lot of history together in her earlier books, I did not have trouble getting right into the story. She includes many of these side characters and subplots, including the residents of Three Pines and some quirky pets which enhance the story nicely, true to the genre. Her many references to tasty food may also inspire the reader to cook up something a little more sophisticated for dinner!

I particularly enjoyed Penny’s references to poetry, ancient philosophy and literature, which tie together many themes and helped me understand how police investigators think and cope with violent situations. I especially liked this line credited to a Buddhist nun:  “Don’t believe everything you think.” In addition, themes of family, long friendships, loyalty and doing the right thing run through every page, something I love to see in a book.

It is tempting to guess the finish as different characters reveal their motives and explain their involvement, but while answers flow freely in the last few chapters, the puzzle isn’t finished until the very last page.

I recommend A Great Reckoning to mystery readers because of its entertaining setting, characters and plot, but all readers will appreciate Penny’s storytelling talent.

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What’s in a mystery? Solving the genre

Everyone loves a good story and there’s nothing better than an intriguing mystery. But there are lots of books with the mystery label so how do you define the genre?

In the typical mystery, the main character solves a crime or a series of crimes and the story finishes with a nice tie-in of facts and events. It’s often full of puzzling clues, shady characters and red herrings. Sometimes the characters are amateur sleuths, sometimes they are professional detectives. While some readers like to solve the puzzle ahead of time, others prefer to see the story unfold. Many readers like complex stories, others like a fast-moving plot.



Crooked Letter, Crooked Letter by Tom Franklin
is an excellent mystery crime story about a town hampered by racism.

Mystery writers understand that readers have different tastes, which has led to many subgenres. The cozy mystery takes place in an intimate setting and leaves out the gory details. Hard boiled and noir mysteries are gritty and violent. Procedurals include a blow-by-blow analysis. Historical mysteries (surprise!) take place in the past.


     

Second Street Station and Brooklyn on Fire by Lawrence H. Levy are entertaining historical mysteries set in 1890s New York.

A developing subgenre is the science fiction mystery, which places its characters in a supernatural element. Adding to the list are legal and medical mysteries and comic capers. For those who prefer nonfiction, there are plenty of true crime stories. In Cold Blood by Truman Capote is one of the most well-known true crime stories and one that I want to read.

And for readers who like happy endings, there is the romantic suspense in which love and justice conquer. If you like this subgenre, check out Everything We Keep by Kerry Lonsdale.

While these mysteries involve solving a crime, thrillers and suspense come from a different angle – in these the protagonist is in high stakes danger from the very beginning. Many twists and turns propel the reader to an exciting conclusion.


  

If you like medical thrillers, you will enjoy Eating Bull by Carrie Rubin and her earlier book, The Seneca Scourge by Carrie Rubin, which steps into the medical sci-fi world.

No matter the style, writers of all subgenres often create lasting characters that feature in entire series of books. For an avid reader, what’s better than the anticipation of the next story?

In a rut? Expand your scope! Many mysteries include complex characters and dramatic settings and open the genre to readers who might not otherwise venture down the mystery aisle. From classic authors like Edgar Allan Poe, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle and Agatha Christie to modern writers like Michael Connelly, Peter May and Tana French, you are bound to find an exciting story!

Some mysteries and thrillers overlap subgenres, making them hard to label but always great to read!


  

Death in a Red Canvas Chair and Death in a Dacron Sail by N. A. Granger are a little bit cozy and a little bit medical and a lot of fun to read.

In the Woods by Tana French is a psychological crime story with many interesting characters.

Echo Park by Michael Connelly features the recurring character Harry Bosch, also a popular video series on Amazon. Soon I’ll be reading another by Connelly – The Lincoln Lawyer, Book 1 of the Mikey Haller series.

     

If you like dramatic landscapes and complex characters you will enjoy The Lewis Trilogy by Peter May. I’ve read The Blackhouse and The Lewis Man and I’m getting ready to read The Chessmen.

Others I’ve recently read include:

Caught by Harlan Coben
The Fever by Megan Abbott

The Good Neighbor by A.J. Banner

I’m a novice mystery reader and I’m having fun learning more about the genre. The books I’ve listed represent only a fraction of what’s out there. What type of story do you like? What are your favorites?

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Who’s That Indie Author? Glen Craney

whos-that-indie-author
Author name
:  Glen Craney

Genre:  Historical Fiction and Mystery-Thrillers

Books: The Fire and the Light: A Novel of the Cathars; The Spider and the Stone: A Novel of Scotland’s Black Douglas; The Virgin of the Wind Rose: A Christopher Columbus Mystery-Thriller; The Yanks Are Starving: A Novel of the Bonus Army; The Lucifer Genome: A Conspiracy Thriller (with John Jeter)

     

  

Bio:  Glen is a novelist, screenwriter, journalist, and lawyer. He holds degrees from Indiana University School of Law and Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism. He practiced trial law before joining the Washington, D.C. press corps to cover national politics and the Iran-contra trial. His books have taken readers to Occitania during the Albigensian Crusade, to the Scotland of Robert Bruce, to Portugal during the Age of Discovery, to the trenches of France during World War I, and to the American Hoovervilles of the Great Depression.

Favorite thing about being a writer:  I love to travel to and research the historical sites featured in my books.

Biggest challenge as an indie author:  Wearing two hats–creative artist and businessman–at the same time.

Favorite bookThose by Nigel Tranter, Sharon Key Penman, Gore Vidal

Contact Information:
Author Website:  glencraney.com
Facebook Author Page:  @GlenCraneyAuthor
Twitter: @glencraney
Blog:  historyintofiction.com

Awards/special recognition:

  • Academy of Motion Pictures, Arts and Sciences Nicholl Fellowship Prize for Screenwriting
  • Chaucer Award First Place Category Fiction
    Foreword Reviews Book-of-the-Year Honorable Mention/Finalist (3 times)
  • Best New Fiction, National Indie Excellence Award
    indeBRAG Honoree (2 times)
  • Nautilus Silver Award Winner
  • IPPY Silver Award Winner
  • Eric Hoffer Finalist/Honorable Mention Winner
  • Da Vinci Eye Award Finalist

Are you an indie author?  Do you want to build your indie author network? Get your name out on Who’s That Indie Author!

Email bvitelli2009@gmail.com for a bio template and other details.

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Merging genres – it’s all good!

Source: Pixabay
Source: Pixabay

Is it my imagination or are genres starting to merge?  When is a mystery just a mystery and when is a suspense only a suspense?  And when did historical fiction sneak in?  No matter, the good books keep coming and that’s all we want!

Here’s a list of some quality mystery/suspense/historical fiction that are sharing space on my bookshelf.


blood of the prodigalBlood of the Prodigal by P.L. Gaus – 3 Bookmarks:  Light Amish mystery set in Ohio


Brooklyn on FireBrooklyn on Fire by Lawrence H. Levy – 4 Bookmarks:  Intriguing historical mystery in 1890s Brooklyn


Child 44

Child 44 by Tom Rob Smith – 3 ½ Bookmarks:  Someone is murdering children in Joseph Stalin’s Russia.


Anyone else remember this cover?Coma by Robin Cook – 3 Bookmarks:  Creepy throwback medical thriller from the 70s


Death in a Dacron Sail coverDeath in a Dacron Sail by N. A. Granger – 4 Bookmarks:  Amateur sleuth Rhe Brewster solves a murder in Maine


Death in a Red Canvas Chair coverDeath in a Red Canvas Chair by N. A. Granger – 3 Bookmarks:  Rhe Brewster’s first case


defending jacobDefending Jacob by William Landay – 3 Bookmarks: What do you do when your teenage son is a murder suspect?


Eating BullEating Bull by Carrie Rubin – 4 Bookmarks:  Medical/psychological thriller that tackles obesity and the food industry


Elizabeth is Missing picElizabeth is Missing by Emma Healey – 3 ½ Bookmarks:  An old woman with dementia is sure her friend is missing.


frank mary shelleyFrankenstein by Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley – 4 Bookmarks:  Classic monster story about good and evil


gonegirlGone Girl by Gillian Flynn – 4 Bookmarks:  You can’t believe your spouse in this creepy thriller.


Jane Eyre picJane Eyre by Charlotte Brontë  – 5 Bookmarks:  What are those noises upstairs at Thornfield Hall?


reconstructing ameliaReconstructing Amelia by Kimberly McCreight – 3 Bookmarks:  Teen secrets and cover-ups after a classmate dies


Second Street StationSecond Street Station by Lawrence H. Levy – 4 Bookmarks:  Brooklyn’s first female detective solves a high profile murder.


the girl with the dragon tattoo pic           The Girl who played with fire pic           The girl who kicked the hornet's nest pic           The Girl in the Spider's Web

Stieg Larsson Millennium Series – Lisbeth Salander Novels – 4 Bookmarks:  Suspenseful series about an enigmatic but kick-ass heroine


The Good NeighborThe Good Neighbor by A.J. Banner – 3 Bookmarks:  Questions emerge after a neighbor’s house burns to the ground.


the caged graves picThe Caged Graves by Dianne K. Salerni – 5 Bookmarks:  A mystery about two caged graves outside a cemetery


The DinnerThe Dinner by Herman Koch – 4 Bookmarks:  Twisted murder tale about a family cover-up


the-farm-by-tom-rob-smithThe Farm by Tom Rob Smith – 3 Bookmarks:  Who is telling the truth, Daniel’s mother or father?


The ImmortalsThe Immortals by Jordanna Max Brodsky – 4 Bookmarks:  A modern day Artemis solves a murder in Manhattan


The RackThe Racketeer by John Grisham – 3 Bookmarks:  Clever crime story about a murdered judge


The Silent Wife picThe Silent Wife by A. S. A. Harrison – 4 Bookmarks:  Marital twists and turns in this psychological thriller


What are your favorites in this new literary amalgam?

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