Who’s That Indie Author? Graeme Cumming

Author name: Graeme Cumming

Genre: Where do I start? Seriously, I’d say I write thrillers, but they often cross genres.

Books: Ravens Gathering; Carrion

What’s your story and how did you become a writer? I live in Robin Hood country, so there’s plenty of atmosphere to soak up here. Not that I’ve needed it especially. I’ve enjoyed making up and telling stories since I was a child, though it wasn’t until I was in my 40s that I started taking it more seriously. I have wide and varied tastes when it comes to fiction, which is reflected in my writing.

How do you balance your work with other demands? With difficulty, if I’m honest. I’m not the most disciplined person in the world and find it very easy to get side-tracked on to less important things. But I’m getting better as I get older. Mortality is a big motivator.

Name one of the happiest moments in your life: There are so many to choose from but, bearing in mind this is about my writing life, I’ll pick out selling my business a few years ago. As an event, it happened with very little fanfare, but it allowed me to take five years off work so I could focus on my writing. I’m near the end of year three, so I’ve got even more motivation now!

What’s your approach to writing? Are you a “pantser” or a planner? Planner. My latest book, Carrion, was written without a plan, and it’s taken over a decade to get it how it should have been in the first place. From start to publication, Ravens Gathering took just over eighteen months. That’s still a long time, but it went a lot faster because it was planned.

Could you write in a café with people around? I doubt it. I need a lot of space and quietness around me.

Have you ever written dialogue in a second language? If so, how did you do it? Short answer: no.

What’s your favorite book and what are you reading now? A favourite book would be hard to pin down. There are so many good ones, and often in different ways. I suppose the closest I can get to that would be to say that I’ve read Eagle in the Sky by Wilbur Smith more often than any other. Some of it feels dated now, but the closing pages always leave me with a tear in my eye.

Right now, I’m reading The Last Will of Sven Andersen by fellow Indie author Geoff Le Pard. His books always entertain.

What’s your favorite way to read a book: hardcover, paperback, eReader?  eReader – though I took some convincing in the early days.

Do you think print books will always be around? Yes. In spite of my preference, I do still enjoy picking up and reading a paperback now and again, and I know a lot of people who wouldn’t dream of touching an eReader. There’s also the fact that you can’t get an author to sign an eReader – well, you could, but it wouldn’t be as long lasting!

Would you ever read a book on your phone? I have done, though probably not the whole thing. Usually it’s because I’ve suddenly found myself at a loose end and don’t have anything else to read from.

What’s your go-to device? iPhone, Android or something else? Android, I suppose, but really – in spite of what I’ve said about reading on it – I try not to be too attached to it.

How long could you go without checking your phone? The answer to that varies depending on how engaged I am in what I’m doing. If I’m sailing, for example, I can go for hours without touching it. At the other extreme, there are times when I check it every five minutes.

Do you listen to audiobooks? If you do, what do you do while you’re listening? It’s not something I’ve done in a while. When I did it was usually while I was driving.

Do you like using social media to promote yourself and your book? If so, what’s your favorite platform? Does anyone actually like using social media to promote themselves? Clearly, I do use it, but I don’t feel I’m very good at it. At the moment, aside from my blog, I’m only active on Twitter and Facebook. Of those, I seem to get the better interaction with Facebook.

Website and social media links:
Website: graemecumming.co.uk
Facebook: @GraemeCummingAuthor
Twitter: @GraemeCumming63

Awards/special recognition: Sadly, none I can think of – though I have had some excellent reviews from well-respected book bloggers.


Are you an indie or self-published author?  Do you want to build your author network? Get your name out on Who’s That Indie Author!

Email bvitelli2009@gmail.com for a bio template and other details.

Who’s That Indie Author? John W. Howell

Author name: John W. Howell

Genre: Thrillers mostly

Books: My GRL, His Revenge, Our Justice, Circumstances of Childhood, The Contract

What’s your story and how did you become a writer? I was held prisoner of organized commerce for over forty years. Once I broke out, I started doing what I had wanted to do for all those forty years and that’s write. That’s my story and I’m sticking to it. So far, I have five books published and have finished the sixth which should be ready in June. I live in Lakeway, Texas with my wife and our spoiled rescue pets.

How do you balance your work with other demands? My writing comes first and then after it is done, I spend no less than three hours on other than writing projects. So, my day really breaks down into writing and non-writing. I never spend a whole day doing one or the other exclusively. I think balance is achieved by doing a little of both every day.

Name one of the happiest moments in your life: I have to say one of the happiest moments of my life was the birth of my daughter. The labor was long and hard, and she was born breach. I was so worried and when I finally held her in my arms and looked into her face, I could almost not contain my joy.

What’s your approach to writing? Are you a “pantser” or a planner? I am a dyed in the wool pantser. Most of the time I allow the characters and the story to carry themselves. I do have a rough idea of where I want the story to go but do rely heavily on going with the seat of my pants. One thing I do is lay out the last three lines of the story. In this way I at least know where all this “pantsering” will need to end up.

Could you write in a café with people around? I can write anywhere. I don’t need silence to concentrate. Right now, I’m writing outside while Twiggy my French Bulldog is having a shouting match with the neighbor’s dog.

Have you ever written dialogue in a second language? If so, how did you do it? I have only done a couple of lines of dialog in German. The way I did it was to Google ‘English to German translation,’ and up popped a neat translation engine. I typed in the English phrase and out came the German.

What’s your favorite book and what are you reading now? My favorite book caused me to want to become a writer. It was On the Beach by Neville Shute. What fascinated me was how the characters all dealt with the fact they were going to die. Right now, I am reading one of Mae Clair’s Hodes Hill thrillers, Eventide.

What’s your favorite way to read a book: hardcover, paperback, eReader? I was about to say “propped up in bed” but then re-read the question carefully. I used to be a purist in only reading hardcovers. Then I got a Kindle about seven years ago and as they say, my life changed. The idea of being able to get any book I want in ten seconds convinced me that the Kindle was my reading device of choice.

Do you think print books will always be around? I think there will always be a demand for printed books. There is something to be said for holding an actual book in your hands that the Kindle does not replicate.

Would you ever read a book on your phone? I suppose I would if there was no other way. Call me crazy but I don’t see my phone and me reading books together.

What’s your go-to device? iPhone, Android or something else? iPhone

How long could you go without checking your phone? I never check my phone anymore. I have it on silent and totally ignore it. I have to confess I also have an Apple Watch. It constantly looks at my phone and then tells me everything I need to know instantly. (I know it’s cheating.)

Do you listen to audiobooks? If you do, what do you do while you’re listening? I have not gotten into audiobooks. I do want to convert mine but am trying to figure the best way to do it.

Do you like using social media to promote yourself and your book? If so, what’s your favorite platform? I like Twitter, my blog, Facebook, Pinterest, and Instagram.

Website and social media links:
Blog – Fiction Favorites with John W. Howell: johnwhowell.com
Facebook: John Howell
Twitter: @HowellWave
Authorsdb: John W. Howell
LinkedIn: John W. Howell
Goodreads Author: John W. Howell
Amazon Author: John W. Howell

Awards/special recognition: Honorable mention in the Writer’s Digest Short Story competition. Circumstances of Childhood – Finalist Top Shelf Indie Awards. The Contract – Finalist Indie Book Awards. Winner American Fiction Awards. Semi-Finalist Chanticleer International Book Awards. Finalist IAN Book of the Year Awards


Are you an indie or self-published author?  Do you want to build your author network? Get your name out on Who’s That Indie Author!

Email bvitelli2009@gmail.com for a bio template and other details.

Who’s That Indie Author? Michael J Moore

Author name: Michael J Moore

Genre: Horror/YA/Literary/Thriller

Books: After the Change (YA) (published by MKM Bridge Press 2019); Highway Twenty (Horror) (published by Hellbound Books 2019); Secret Harbor (Literary/Thriller) (to be published by Black Writing in June 2020)

What’s your story and how did you become a writer? I grew up an hour north of Seattle, in a small town called Mount Vernon, Washington. As far back as I can remember, though, I’ve always had an infatuation with bigger cities and horror. When I was in the fourth grade. I remember writing a short thriller, and the school librarian was so impressed that she encouraged me to enter into some young authors contests. I never did, but I wrote periodically after that. All my English teachers pushed me to pursue writing and in the back of my mind, I always planned to. It wasn’t until a few years ago, when I was twenty-nine, that I realized that writing wasn’t just something I was good at, but what I needed to be doing. So I wrote my first book After the Change and I’ve never looked back. I’ve since landed three book deals through different publishers, two of which will be released this year, one of my books was adapted into a play, and was performed in Seattle last year and I’ve had more than a dozen short stories accepted for publication.

How do you balance your work with other demands? With great difficulty. Being a writer and a Father and a husband has all sorts of demands. I just try to make sure I write two thousand words a day and when that’s done, I concentrate on my other responsibilities.

Name one of the happiest moments in your life: The happiest moments in my life were the birth of my two daughters, Gaby and Jazi, closely followed by my current horror novel Highway Twenty being placed on the Preliminary Ballot for Superior Achievement in a Novel for the Bram Stoker Award.

What’s your approach to writing? Are you a “pantser” or a planner? I am definitely a “pantser.” Writing is such a personal and intimate thing, that it’s hard to say where my process differs from others’. I do most of my first draft work in longhand, which I imagine is becoming less frequent these days. I don’t work from an outline. I know some authors do, but it has a negative effect on my creativity. I find the story’s able to play out more organically and less predictable if I don’t plot it too heavily.

Could you write in a café with people around? I could definitely do my marketing and answering of interview questions in a café but I could not write my two thousand words in a café as I need silence. I used to write with the radio playing but I guess old age has affected me and I can’t anymore. Where do I actually write? It’s the most bland, little room you could imagine, with white walls and a tiny wooden desk–two feet, by two feet. It keeps me from becoming distracted during the long hours I spend in it, and allows me to retreat into my real writing space, which is the part of my mind where the stories get stuck after having found their way in.

Have you ever written dialogue in a second language? If so, how did you do it? No I haven’t but I’d like one day to write a book in Spanish given my Latino roots. I would be delighted however if my books were translated into other languages by a translator. What an honour!

What’s your favorite book and what are you reading now? I’m a huge fan of Stephen King. My favourite book is one of his called Joyland. As for what I’m reading now – once again it’s another Stephen King book called The Outsiders.

What’s your favorite way to read a book: hardcover, paperback, eReader? I only read books in paperback. My children love ebooks and my wife likes all formats except hardcover. I’d have to say that hardcover is the least favourite in our family.

Do you think print books will always be around? Absolutely, I’d like to think so. When the internet was invented, the postal services feared that they would go out of business yet they are making just as much profit as ever. The same with movie theatres when Netflix became popular. I feel the same way about print books. There will always be a market for them.

Would you ever read a book on your phone? I wouldn’t read a book on my phone but my wife and children would. I know my wife does a lot of waiting around for the children and so she often reads short stories on her phone if she’s forgotten her devices.

What’s your go-to device? iPhone, Android or something else? My go to device is my tablet. I use any form of tablet I can get my hands on. I write on the tablet too if I’m not at home. I’m not a fan of a certain brand.

How long could you go without checking your phone? I’d say as long as it takes to write two thousand words. So much of my marketing is done on Twitter and Facebook that the phone becomes a part of me as it’s portable and more relaxing to work with.

Do you listen to audiobooks? If you do, what do you do while you’re listening? No, I don’t listen to audiobooks. My wife used to when she was pregnant and I know she does now. Both of my published books After the Change and Highway Twenty are available on Audible and my wife has listened to both of them.

Do you like using social media to promote yourself and your book? If so, what’s your favorite platform? Social media is a necessity, whether we like it or not. I use mostly Twitter and Facebook but am present on the others too.

Website and social media links:
Email: michaeljmoorewriting@gmail.com
Website: Michael J Moore Writing
Facebook: Michael J Moore
Twitter: @MichaelJMoore20
Instagram: michaeljmoorewriting

Awards/special recognition: Honorable Mention in the L. Ron Hubbard Writers of the Future contest; Preliminary Ballot for Superior Achievement in a Novel for the Bram Stoker Award 2019


Are you an indie or self-published author?  Do you want to build your author network? Get your name out on Who’s That Indie Author!

Email bvitelli2009@gmail.com for a bio template and other details.

Book Review: You by Caroline Kepnes

You
by
Caroline Kepnes

Rating:

Joe Goldberg is an average guy working in a bookstore in the East Village. In walks Guinevere Beck a beautiful aspiring writer. They flirt and Joe’s obsession begins. It’s not hard to find out more about the girl who goes as “Beck” because she’s all over social media and that’s how Joe gets his foot in.

You is an addicting story about a guy who seems pretty normal, loves books (he’s a bit of a book snob too), but will stop at nothing to get to the girl. Joe is a weird combination of likable and a little bit scary, a perfect character for a thriller.

And Beck is a mystery. Her public image on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram is one thing, clever, cute, literary. But she has a reckless side that Joe wants to protect her from. He’s working people, but is she doing the same? A mix-in of ambitious, needy and maybe not-so-good friends makes Beck’s character even more interesting.

You is told from Joe’s perspective. Not talking to the reader, though. He’s talking to Beck. And the whole time he’s explaining to her what he’s all about.

I devoured this book. I don’t want to say too much because this is the kind of story you want to experience, one creepy moment at a time. You might wonder why I’m giving 5 stars to a book that might seem a little trashy when you start reading it. Read on and you’ll discover that the genius of the storytelling is that Joe’s character becomes almost completely knowable by the end. I say almost because there are plenty of issues to resolve at the end of You, explained, I hope, in the sequel, Hidden Bodies.

Anyone who likes to read will love Kepnes’s literary references because, you know, the story does revolve around a bookstore. And the music references are equally fun, especially the one that indirectly refers to the book’s title. It was only by chance that I caught it.

You is a Lifetime series and I’ve already started watching it. It’s equally addicting. I recommend the book to readers who like stories of obsession and complex characters.

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On blogging and menu pages

If you’re interested in seeing what I’ve read since the beginning of Book Club Mom, check out the yearly “Books of…” in the top menu. Here’s a quick run-down of them:


Books of 2013

Book Club Mom was born in 2013. Understanding blogging takes a while and learning how to write proper book reviews takes even longer. So this was the year of figuring it out. But I read a lot in 2013. Classics, new books, Young Adult and several random books. And some terrific 5-star reads, including Gone With the WindThe Giver, To Kill a Mockingbird and Life After Life.


Books of 2014

This year I read a lot of short fiction and re-read some of my favorite children’s books. I also mixed it up with my favorite classics – Jane Eyre, The Great Gatsby, Breakfast at Tiffany’s and Lord of the Flies, a wildly popular book of the time, Me Before You, and one of my favorite reads of the year, The Interestings.

And 2014 was also the year when I re-read my all-time favorite book, Youngblood Hawke!


Books of 2015

This year I read a variety of genres, including short fiction, and dipped into some nonfiction. I remember loving The Sound and the Fury when I was in college, but I had a hard time getting through it this time! I re-read one of my favorites, The Grapes of Wrath and read Julius Caesar because one of my kids was reading it in school.

I had never read Slaughterhouse Five and was blown away by it. What a book! And of course, All the Light We Cannot See was an unforgettable story. Some popular books and some fun ones rounded out the year.


Books of 2016

This year I did two things that were different. I started writing articles based on books I’d read for a website. And I got a job in a public library. I did my first summer reading challenge which had me reading different types of books. I also renewed my interest in thrillers and historical fiction. I went on a Hemingway kick and reread A Farewell to Arms, The Old Man and the Sea and read A Moveable Feast for the first time. And this was the year I read some great indie and self-published books, including Eating Bull by Carrie and Calmer Girls by Jennifer Kelland Perry.  Some nonfiction rounded things out, including The Ghost Map, which one of my kids had to read for his freshman seminar in college.


Books of 2017

2017 was a different year because I started to get more into thrillers. It’s fun to mix them in to other types of books. I also started helping out with the Whodunits Mystery Book Club at the library where I work, so I took up mysteries. That’s a genre I hadn’t read much of before and I read some excellent ones like Crooked Letter, Crooked Letter and The Lewis Trilogy, which is set in the Outer Hebrides of Scotland. I did our library’s summer reading challenge again and read some different books, like The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin and Black Beauty.

I also read two books by my author friends, The Seneca Scourge by Carrie Rubin (don’t read this on an airplane! 😬) and Calmer Secrets by Jennifer Kelland Perry, a great sequel to Calmer Girls.


Books of 2018

2018 was the year I started listening to audiobooks. I’d never tried them and wanted to “hear” what they were all about. Although I still prefer reading books, I found that listening to audiobooks was a fun way to pass the time while I was walking or doing things around the house. I learned, however, not to listen while I was cooking because of a measuring incident while listening to a thriller!

I read some excellent nonfiction this year, including Killers of the Flower Moon, Educated and Let’s Pretend This Never Happened. And I continued to enjoy several of my blogging/writing friends’ books, including The Bone Curse by Carrie Rubin, The Storyteller Speaks by Annika Perry, Second Chance Romance by Jill Weatherholt and Death in a Mudflat by Noelle Granger.


Books of 2019

2019 was a great reading year. I listened to more audiobooks, read mysteries for work, and talked more with my work friends about what books were hot, which led to me reading (and listening to) Long Way Down and What If? and reading Lab Girl and The Beneficiary. I read a few debut books that became really hot during the year, The Silent Patient and Miracle Creek.

Several 5-star reads included In Cold Blood, Less and Where the Crawdads Sing.


Books of 2020

Just getting started!


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Books about neighbors – stay away from that window!

Image: Pixabay

Chances are wherever you live, you’re going to have neighbors. And neighbors always make for good stories.  Even if we’re polite and won’t admit it, most of us like to know what our neighbors are doing. But sometimes knowing too much is a dangerous thing. Remember the 1954 Alfred Hitchcock movie, Rear Window?

There’s no shortage of books about mysterious neighbors. Here are a few I’ve read, and a TBR list to keep you in your reading chair and away from the window!

The Good Neighbor by A.J. Banner


Those People by Louise Candlish


Stillhouse Lake by Rachel Caine


From Goodreads:

Good Neighbors by Joanne Serling
Bad Neighbors by Maia Chance
Dangerous Neighbors by Beth Kephartan
Quiet Neighbors by Catriona McPherson

The New Neighbors by Simon Lelic
The Perfect Neighbors by Rachel Sargeant
The Neighbors by Hannah Mary McKinnon
The Neighbors Are Watching by Debra Ginsberg

What’s your favorite neighbor book? Leave a title in the comments section.

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Mysteries and thrillers to keep you guessing

Image: Pixabay

I read some good mysteries and thrillers this year, some debuts and others by established authors. Great for seasoned readers of this genre and everyone in between! Take a look:


Back of Beyond by C. J. Box

Tense murder mystery set in Yellowstone National Park, with a suspended investigator on the heels of a wildnerness adventure tour, sure his son is in danger.


Bluebird, Bluebird by Attica Locke

A conflicted Texas Ranger is in hot water with the force for helping out a family friend facing murder charges. Forced to turn in his badge, he goes rogue with a new investigation.


A Duty to the Dead by Charles Todd

Entertaining historical mystery, set in England during World War I. The first book of the Bess Crawford Mysteries, introducing Bess as a highly skilled young nurse aboard the doomed HMHS Britannic.


The Escape Room by Megan Goldin

When Vincent deVries of Stanhope & Sons summons his Wall Street investment banker team to a compulsory meeting, the last thing they expect is to be trapped in an elevator, meant to be the setting for an escape room activity.


Frog Music by Emma Donoghue

Fictionalized account of the 1876 murder of Jenny Bonnet, an enigmatic free spirit in San Francisco, who dressed like a man and earned a living catching frogs for restaurants.


The Glass Room by Ann Cleeves

Detective Inspector Vera Stanhope has another crime to solve when her neighbor, Joanna Tobin, goes missing and an influential professor is murdered. Could Joanna, who is off her meds, be responsible for the professor’s death?


Miracle Creek by Angie Kim

Debut novel and a mystery/courtroom drama in which a young mother stands trial for the murder of her 8-year-old autistic son.


The Silent Patient by Alex Michaelides

Alicia Berenson does something strange after she kills her husband. She stops talking. The only clue to explain her actions is a self-portrait, painted a few days after the murder.


Those People by Louise Candlish

On the problem of despicable neighbors, here’s a new book about a couple that moves into an idyllic and award-winning neighborhood in South London and drives the families to desperation.


What the Dead Know by Laura Lippman

It’s 1975 when two sisters disappear from a busy mall outside Baltimore, Maryland. They separate at the mall and never come home. Thirty years later, a mysterious woman returns and claims to be one of the missing girls.


Did you read any good mysteries or thrillers this year?

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The Escape Room by Megan Goldin

The Escape Room
by
Megan Goldin

Rating:

When Vincent deVries of Stanhope & Sons summons his Wall Street investment banker team to a compulsory meeting, the last thing they expect is an escape room activity in an elevator. They grudgingly put their plans on hold. Sam has missed his flight to Antigua and his wife is livid. Sylvie might still make her flight to Paris to meet her boyfriend, but she hasn’t packed. And Jules has downed a couple whiskeys on his way over. The group has intense, cutthroat relationships with each other and there are rumors of looming layoffs. Each knows they can’t afford to miss the meeting, which by the way is in an unfinished office building. Even Vincent, their boss, is unsure who really called them together.

In a locked and stalled elevator, the group goes to work on the cryptic clues, encouraged as they advance to the next levels. But soon they suspect they are trapped and begin to turn on each other. As time passes, dynamics between Vincent’s team deteriorate, leading to shocking power plays. What kind of life or death exercise is this?

In alternating chapters, we meet Sara Hall, a former Stanhope banker, who tells of joining Vincent’s team and enduring the grueling hours and impossible deadlines that are part of the ultra-competitive banking scene. Sara’s story advances as the elevator exercise deteriorates, and the reader must wait for the big reveal.

I enjoyed this modern and original setting that uses a tried and true dynamic – forcing people who hate each other into dangerous and confined situations and seeing what happens. I’ve always been a reader who likes to simply go along for the ride, instead of working out the angles, and I like how the conflicts between Sylvie, Jules, Sam and Vincent develop. I think the author does a great job showing how Vincent continues to try to lead the group, despite the hatred between its members.

Although the finish was a little far-fetched, I was otherwise satisfied with how the author tied up the loose ends and I liked reading about the double-edged flash and glamour of the investment banking world. I recommend The Escape Room to readers who like mysteries and thrillers in which characters are pushed to the extreme.

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Who’s That Indie Author? Amy Tasukada

Genre:  Gay romance and thrillers

Books:
The Yakuza Path Series:
Blood Stained Tea
Better Than Suicide
One Thousand Cranes
The Deafening Silence

Would it Be Okay to Love You? Series and Book 1
Year One Book 2
Happy Merry Christmas Book 3
Year Two Book 4
Year Three Book 5

What’s your story and how did you become a writer?  I was an only child so would make up stories while I played with my toy horses. Soon I wrote those down. Eventually, I found I enjoyed writing Japanese inspired gay fiction most. I write everything gritty mafia thrillers to fluffy, contemporary romance. I enjoy weaving exciting tales of suspense, love, and gore.

How do you balance your work with other demands?  I try to stay really organized and break everything into smaller task so it doesn’t feel too overwhelming. I also get up two hours before work to get the writing done before anything else.

Name one of the happiest moments in your life:  There was a tea house in my home town that I would go to almost weekly. All my friends would go and we’d get dressed up and drink proper British style tea.

What’s your approach to writing? Are you a “pantser” or a planner?  I am a huge planner. My last outline was over 18,000 words. I even have someone read over my outline and make comments to edit. I want everything already figured out when I start the rough draft.

Could you write in a café with people around?  More often people distract me when I’m at a café, but there’s a really good Korean café nearby. Their booths are built into the wall. So it feels like you’re in a cave. I can write there just fine.

Have you ever written dialogue in a second language? If so, how did you do it?  Though all of my books take place in Japan and with Japanese characters I do not write any extensive dialogue in Japanese.

What’s your favorite book and what are you reading now?  My favorite book is In Search of Lost Time by Marcel Proust. It’s an epic French classic and I love the descriptions.  I recently finished Go by Kazuki Kaneshiro. It’s about a second generation Korean coming of age in Japan.

What’s your favorite way to read a book: hardcover, paperback, eReader?  I like eBooks because they are cheaper and I always feel like I read faster on them.

Do you think print books will always be around?  Yes, there are some people who enjoy holding a book.

Would you ever read a book on your phone?  I do this as a last resort like when I’m standing in line at the Post Office and it’s taking a long time.

What’s your go-to device? iPhone, Android or something else?  Does my desktop computer count? Give me a computer over a tablet or phone any day. I want a keyboard and mouse!

How long could you go without checking your phone?  During the weekend I never look at it. During the week I’ll poke around it.

Do you listen to audiobooks? If you do, what do you do while you’re listening?  I recently got into non-fiction audiobooks. I do about half an hour of stretching in the morning since I’ve herniated two discs in my spine about a year ago. It’s a nice way to get those non-fictions books I’ve wanted to read out of the way.

Do you like using social media to promote yourself and your book? If so, what’s your favorite platform? I spend a lot of time on YouTube, but probably do a bad job promoting my books there. I’m fond of Facebook, too.

Website and social media links:
Website – https://www.amytasukada.com/
YouTube – https://www.youtube.com/user/amytasukada
Facebook – https://www.facebook.com/amytasukadaofficial/
Twitter: @amytasukada

Awards/special recognition:  My first two thriller novels won an honorable mention at the Rainbow Awards for thrillers.


Are you an indie author?  Do you want to build your indie author network? Get your name out on Who’s That Indie Author!

Email bvitelli2009@gmail.com for a bio template and other details.

The Banker’s Wife by Cristina Alger

The Banker’s Wife
by
Cristina Alger

Rating:

(and a half!)

When a private plane disappears over the Swiss Alps and reports of a wreckage follow, Annabel Werner must now accept that her husband Matthew is dead. She’s been the expat wife of an up-and-coming private banker for the powerful Swiss Bank. Now she’s a widow and she begins to question the details of her husband’s disappearance. Besides the pilot, the only other passenger was Fatima Amir, a wealthy and beautiful hedge fund manager, with family ties to Syrian dictator Bashar Al-Assad. Matthew never discussed his clients with Annabel, but she will soon discover shocking and terrifying facts about her husband and Swiss Bank.

Meanwhile, investigative journalist Marina Tourneau agrees to meet a mysterious messenger in Paris and receive secret bank account data pertaining to Morty Reiss, a missing and presumed dead Ponzi schemer. This is the next big story, obsessively researched by Marina’s mentor, Duncan Sander. The media investigation will inevitably collide with Annabel’s digging and reveal a massive illegal private banking system in which terrorists, corrupt politicians, tax-evading CEOs and drug criminals all hold secret and dirty numbered accounts. Can the informants deliver the information before they’re tracked down and killed?

I enjoyed the fast-paced tension of this intriguing story, which gives readers an imaginative glimpse into the lives of the ridiculously wealthy. Plot lines are nicely tied together, with several interesting clues and finish with a satisfying conclusion and a couple of surprises. This is the perfect book for readers who enjoy stories about the glamour of high living, fashion, expensive art and sophisticated characters. Of course, the women are all stunningly beautiful and the men have piercing eyes and fantastic builds. And everyone went to either Harvard or Yale! I don’t think this detracts from this highly entertaining story, however, because the author delivers an intelligent plot with interesting characters.

I listened to the audio version, then read through the print, to get the facts straight. If you’re a listener, it’s good to just submit yourself to the plot and characters. If you want to keep track of who’s who, you might want to read the print version. I recommend The Banker’s Wife to readers who want to get away from regular life and enjoy an absorbing and fast-moving story.

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