What’s That Book? Something to Hide: A Lynley Novel by Elizabeth George

Hi Everyone! Today I’d like to welcome Noelle Granger, today’s contributor to What’s That Book. Thank you, Noelle!

Title: Something to Hide: A Lynley Novel                                                  

Author: Elizabeth George

Genre: British mystery, police procedural

Rating: 4.5 out of 5.

What’s it about? Elizabeth George is an American writer who sets her mysteries in Great Britain. There are eighteen books in this series and I’ve read more than half of them. Her main character is Detective Inspector Thomas Lynley, the eighth earl of Asherton, who has a massive intellect and who struggles constantly with his background. The books have followed him over the years, through his marriage and the loss of his wife and child, and his tolerance for the foibles of his co-workers.

His partner is the decidedly unattractive Detective Sergeant Barbara Havers, who comes from a much lower class. Lynley and Havers clash constantly because she is short-tempered and very aware of her class, making her very difficult to work with. Winston Nkata is his Detective Constable, a very tall black African with a remarkable scar on his face who can relate to victims where Havers cannot.

George writes massive books, and I’ve heard complaints they can be used a doorstops. But despite the length, they are works of art—fiercely intelligent, stunningly researched, and always enticing. This novel concerns the practice of FGM (female genital mutilation) an underground, ritual practice in the Nigerian population of London. As usual with her books, written in third person omniscient, the story opens with vignettes of various characters that at first seem disconnected but which become increasingly entangled as the story unfolds. The central plot is the death, later deemed murder, of a black police sergeant who is investigating FGM in the Nigerian community. Lynley is assigned to the case, which has cultural associations that are completely foreign to him. As usual with George, there are a number of threads to the solution to the case, including a father’s cruel, violent insistence on subjecting his eight-year-old daughter to the practice. I kept reading on because I had no idea who the murderer was and there were plenty of candidates.

George’s character development is compelling and in this book, we learn more about Havers (who makes me want to tear my hair out) and Nakata, a gentle giant with a wonderful family. The author teaches the reader a good deal about the tribal origins of FGM and the work the British police are doing to root out its practice and stop it.

How did you hear about it? This book was on a best seller list.

Have you read other books by this author? Yes, quite a few.

What did you like about the book? The entangled plot line and the characters.

Closing comments:  I consider Elizabeth George an author in the footsteps of Dame PD James.

Contributor:  N (Noelle) A. Granger is a Professor Emerita at the University of North Carolina School of Medicine. She is the author of the Rhe Brewster mystery series and the historical fiction novel, The Last Pilgrim. You can learn more about Noelle at saylingaway.wordpress.comand na-granger.com. She lives in Durham, North Carolina, with her husband and a Maine coon cat.


Have you read something good?  Want to talk about it? Consider being a contributor to What’s That Book.

Email Book Club Mom at bvitelli2009@gmail.com for information.

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Book Club Mom’s February 2021 Recap

Hi all! I hope you are doing well. Thanks to everyone who visited my blog this month. I very much appreciate your support! February was a pretty good month. We got a lot more snow, but now most of it has melted, except for a big pile the plows made on the island in our cul de sac.

Unrelated to books, this month I participated in the 24th Annual Great Backyard Bird Count. For four days, I counted the different types of birds I saw in our backyard. I downloaded and app called Merlin Bird ID on my phone and it helped me identify them. The data goes to researchers at the National Audubon Society, Cornell Lab of Ornithology and Birds Canada and helps them learn more about how birds are doing and how to protect them and the environment. I had a lot of fun doing it and the app was easy to use. This is a global event and anyone can participate. If you’re interested in doing it next year, you can learn more about it at birdcount.org.

I also got back in the reading and blogging swing this month. Here’s a rundown of what I read and other posts.

Book Reviews

Cary Grant: A Brilliant Disguise by Scott Eyman – 5 stars

The Perfect Wife by Blake Pierce – 3 stars

My Lovely Wife by Samantha Downing – 4 stars

Ask Again, Yes by Mary Beth Keane – 4 stars

The Perks of Being a Wallflower by Stephen Chbosky – 4 stars


Who’s That Indie Author and Author Updates

Angela Paolantonio

B. Lynn Goodwin

Tammie Painter


What’s That Book?

Torn Between Worlds by Nancy Blodgett Klein – reviewed by Darlene Foster


Miscellaneous

Perfect characters and situations gone wrong – books with perfect in their titles

Share your thoughts on What’s That Book – an invitation to you!


Spring is only a couple weeks away – are you as ready as I am?

Thanks for visiting – come back soon!

What’s That Book? The Curious Charms of Arthur Pepper by Phaedra Patrick

TitleThe Curious Charms of Arthur Pepper

Author:  Phaedra Patrick

Genre: Fiction. Tough to classify, part slice-of-life, part humor, part adventure, and part mystery

Rating:

What’s it about?  A reclusive widower has finally decided to go through his wife’s belongings when he finds a charm bracelet he never knew she had. Curiosity gets the better of him and he slowly unravels the story behind each charm. This discovery not only reveals things he never knew about his wife, but also forces him out of his comfort zone and helps him realize a side of himself he never knew he had.

How did you hear about it? Just a random bit of browsing through the library catalog

Closing comments: This is a charming (sorry for the pun) slice of life story that readers of a Man Called Ove and The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry will enjoy.

Contributor: Tammie PainterI turn wickedly strong tea into imaginative fiction – You can read about my adventures over at TammiePainter.com/blog.

Many thanks to Tammie Painter who was generous enough to submit two book reviews for What’s That Book. Click here to read her review of A Prisoner of Birth by Jeffrey Archer.


Have you read something good?  Want to talk about it?
Consider being a contributor to What’s That Book.

Email Book Club Mom at bvitelli2009@gmail.com for information.

Thanks for visiting – come back soon!