Spotlight on Indie Authors Jan – June 2022

Hi Everyone! Today I want to give special recognition to these indie authors and their books! Click/tap on their names to meet them.

From left Bjørn Larssen, Leon Stevens, Mark Paxson, Geoff Le Pard

From left, Darlene Foster, Christina Consolino, Anne Goodwin, Thomas “Buddy” Bardenwerper


And while you’re at it, take a look at some of the books they’ve written!


Would you like to be featured on Who’s That Indie Author? Email bvitelli2009@gmail.com for more information.

Have you already been featured? No problem – share your author news on Book Club Mom’s Author Update.

Email bvitelli2009@gmail.com for more information.

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Who’s That Indie Author? Bjørn Larssen

Author Name: Bjørn Larssen

Genre: historical fiction, fantasy

Books: Storytellers (historical fiction set in Iceland), Children (a dark Norse myth retelling), Why Odin Drinks (humorous Norse myth retelling)

Bio: Bjørn Larssen is a Norse heathen made in Poland, but mostly located in a Dutch suburb, except for his heart which he lost in Iceland. He has a degree in mathematics and has worked as a graphic designer, a model, a bartender, and a blacksmith (not all at the same time). Winner of Queer Indie Lit award, Stabby nominee, Eric Hoffer Grand Prize Award finalist.

What got you started as a writer? In 2015 I tried to lift a massive Ikea kitchen unit and ended in a special profiled chair, only left to eat, sleep, and see doctors. I’ve always told people I’d totally write a book if I had time. Well, now I had all the time, a life I needed to escape, and a story demanding to be told…

What is your writing routine? I don’t really have one. There are days when I write for hours, followed by days when I just keep existing until I can go to bed and hope for a better tomorrow.

What route did you take to get your books published? During work on Storytellers, my debut, I was researching various forms of publishing. It turned out that traditional publishing had nothing to offer me except validation—after years of rejections from agents and editors, of course. I never received a single rejection, because I never sent a single query. I chose self-publishing and I have no regrets.

What things do you do to promote your books? I post silly stuff on Twitter and Facebook, I have a mailing list, a ko-fi page, a website in dire need of updating. I write guest posts or do interviews like this one 🙂 I’ve been just about to join TikTok for at least a year. Not that I’m afraid or anything…

What is your favorite genre to read and why? In 2019-2020 I went through lots of grimdark, then suddenly reality started doing whatever it is that it’s doing. I switched to romcoms and humour, and stayed there.

Do you prefer to write dialogue or description? Dialogue—once I find the character’s voice. Readers tell me my descriptions are great—the word “cinematic” gets used a lot. They have no idea what I see, hear, taste, smell, and fail to describe well enough.

Have any of your characters ever surprised you? Did this change the plot of your book? When I try to force a character to do something for the sake of the plot, they often cross their arms on their chest and announce “Nope, I wouldn’t do that.” Unfortunately they don’t tell me what they would do instead. It’s up to me to tweak the plot and hope they like the new one.

What is the most difficult thing you have accomplished in your life? Moving from Poland to the Netherlands. It was the best, the scariest, and the BIGGEST decision I have ever made. The only thing I ever regretted was not doing it earlier.

What three events or people have most influenced how you live your life? Furiously Happy by Jenny Lawson and Hyperbole and a Half by Allie Brosh are two books that literally saved my life. And… my therapist. After two years of c-PTSD therapy I’m such a different person that I need to get re-acquainted with myself. So far I seem quite nice.

What would you tell your younger self? Just because you are forced to do adult things, that doesn’t mean you’re an adult. Don’t be so hard on yourself. (Then I’d give him a long, warm hug.) And don’t lift kitchen units.

Have you ever met up with a bear on a hike? If so, what did you do? If not, are you looking up what to do right now? In the gay community, a “bear” is a big, hairy beast of a man. I have met up with a bear or two on hikes. 😉

You’re locked in your local library for the night with no dinner. Thank goodness you have water, but you only have enough change to buy one item from the vending machine. Choices are limited to: Fudge Pop Tarts, Snickers or Doritos. Which would you choose and why? Snickers. I don’t like Doritos (pauses for gasps to subside), I don’t know Fudge Pop Tarts, and I don’t like taking risks when I can only pick one.

What’s the largest number of people you’ve had in your kitchen at one time? Oh, ten or so? In a kitchen made for two if they really like each other? Every good party ends up moving to the kitchen, it’s a law.

Closing thoughts: I always blank at open questions… um… Sam Ryder is a human golden retriever. It’s a thought, right?

Thank you so much for having me!

Website and social media links:
Website: www.bjornlarssen.com
Twitter: @bjornlarssen
Instagram: bjorn_larssen


Are you an indie or self-published author?  Do you want to build your author network? Get your name out on Who’s That Indie Author!

Email bvitelli2009@gmail.com for a bio template and other details.

Who’s That Indie Author? Leon Stevens

Author Name: Leon Stevens

Genre: Poetry and Science Fiction

Books: Lines by Leon: Poems, Prose, and Pictures, A Wonder of Words, The Knot at the End of the Rope and Other Short Stories, The View from Here, Journeys: Eight Original Pieces for Classical Guitar

Bio: I am a Canadian multi-genre author, composer, guitarist, songwriter, and artist with a Bachelor of Music and Education.

What got you started as a writer? I became a writer out of necessity. Along with songwriting, poetry was therapeutic and allowed me to accept and make sense of events and situations in my life. I decided that what I wrote could help and entertain others, so I decided to publish my first book of poetry.

What is your writing routine? I don’t have a set routine. However, most of my blog posts are written in the morning, so often, I’ll write a few things down after that. I’m a slow writer and will often write when inspiration strikes. I do try to write each day.

What route did you take to get your books published? I made a mistake that many new authors have made and used a vanity press to publish. I had no idea what to do, so it seemed to be the quickest and easiest way. They did provide a lot of invaluable publishing and marketing information and took care of the distribution. All my other books have been through KDP.

What things do you do to promote your books? Like most indie authors, money is a concern. Advertising costs vary greatly, and it’s a lot of work and research to decide where the investment will be the most effective. I also use BookFunnel and StoryOrigin to connect with other authors to promote to their readership. I have been interviewing authors as well, which is a great way to not only help promote their work but to introduce mine to others.

What is your favorite genre to read and why? I try to read a variety of genres, but I am very picky, so many books get left unfinished. Science fiction and historical fiction is what I prefer.

Do you prefer to write dialogue or description? I used to struggle with dialogue. Often, if I am getting stuck with descriptions, I’ll just write dialogue to get things moving. Also, I’m not one for writing lengthy descriptions, which is probably why when I set out to write my first novel, it wound up being a novella.

Have any of your characters ever surprised you? Did this change the plot of your book?
Nah. They’re pretty open to dealing with the situations I put them in. I haven’t heard any complaints. Yet.

What is the most difficult thing you have accomplished in your life?  Probably getting my degrees. 

What events or people have most influenced how you live your life? I think my father has had the most influence. He was the one who instilled the love of science fiction in me at a young age. He is such a hard worker, and I’ve never seen him get mad or complain. When people say, “You’re just like your dad.” I know I’m doing something right.

What would you tell your younger self? Funny you should ask. In my latest poetry book, I wrote about just that.

What I Want to be When I’m Young

I want to listen more. To the people who know better. To the people who say, “Don’t make the same mistakes that I did.” Learning from mistakes? Sure, we do have to make errors in life sometimes, but what’s wrong with looking up how to spell a word or use spell-check…? Nothing.

I want to set goals. Obtainable ones. Despite what people say, you can’t be anything you want to be. That’s a lie. There are some things that you just won’t be able to do. Although, by trying and failing, you will find out what you are good at.

I want to be a better student. I didn’t try my best. I think that I needed glasses. I didn’t understand the importance of learning—the importance of wanting to learn.

I want to not be a quitter. Piano, guitar, sports. I should have tried harder. Much harder.

I want to save 10% of all my earnings. I shudder to do the calculations. I never made a lot, but my father-in-law always said that compound interest was the eighth wonder of the world. He was right.

I want to be brave. Not reckless, just not so afraid.

I want to stay awake so that I can see Halley’s comet.

Have you ever met up with a bear on a hike? If so, what did you do? If not, are you looking up what to do right now? I have. Sort of. We could hear the bear just around the corner. There was a tree moving, so it was probably scratching it. We turned around and headed back to the tent. The next day we successfully completed the hike with no encounters. Except for the angry squirrel.

You’re locked in your local library for the night with no dinner. Thank goodness you have water, but you only have enough change to buy one item from the vending machine. Choices are limited to: Fudge Pop Tarts, Snickers or Doritos. Which would you choose and why? No contest. Snickers. It’s a delicious meal. But those Doritos are looking pretty tasty. Just my luck, whatever I buy will get stuck.

What’s the largest number of people you’ve had in your kitchen at one time? Interesting question. Had I known I’d be asked this later in my life, I might have kept a record. It’s funny how people gravitate to kitchens during get-togethers. Closer to the food and beer I suppose.

Closing thoughts: Thank you for having me here. Any opportunity to get the word out about my books is appreciated.  

Website and social media links: I have recently discovered linktree, so all my links can be found in one handy place: https://linktr.ee/leonstevens


Are you an indie or self-published author?  Do you want to build your author network? Get your name out on Who’s That Indie Author!

Email bvitelli2009@gmail.com for a bio template and other details.

Who’s That Indie Author? Mark Paxson

Author Name: Mark Paxson

Genre: Primarily literary, but a little bit of everything, including a legal drama (my first novel), and a domestic thriller (my current WIP)

Books: One Night in Bridgeport; Shady Acres and Other Stories; The Marfa Lights and Other Stories; Deviation; The Irrepairable Past; and The Dime

Bio: A semi-retired government attorney, I live in California. Two adult sons, two dogs, a wife, and a whole bunch of interests like painting, writing, cycling, hiking, gardening, cooking and baking that keep me motivated to keep exploring.

What got you started as a writer? I’ve always been a voracious reader but didn’t believe I could write, although I spent years imagining writing a novel. One day, almost 20 years ago, I outlined a story in my head on my drive home and I’ve been writing ever since.

What is your writing routine? I have a bit of a block that has lasted for a number of years and I allow all of life’s distractions to deprive me of a writing routine. But … these days, I write when I can and am making a little bit of headway. Typically Saturday or Sunday afternoons when I’m simply worn out by all of the distractions.

What route did you take to get published? With my first novel, I tried a little bit to get an agent. Without success there, I turned to what was then CreateSpace to publish a paperback and used KDP to publish the eBook. That’s what I’ve been doing ever since. With my last novel, The Dime, I tried again to get an agent without any success. I apparently don’t know the secret handshake.

What things do you do to promote your books? I have two blogs that I use to share news about my writing and publishing. I also use Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook but not relentlessly like some authors. When I publish something, I post and tweet about it. And occasionally when I get a good review, I’ll use that to remind people that I’ve got books out there. I also try some of the promo sites, but have found almost no success with them lately.

What is your favorite genre to read and why? This may be the most difficult question to answer. I’ll read anything. The books that have the most meaning to me are the ones that make me feel something deeply. I’m not ashamed to cry while I’m reading.

Do you prefer to write dialogue or description? Dialogue. I’m not a fan of a lot of description when I’m reading and I think that comes across in my writing as well. I want to leave things to the reader’s imagination and just tell the story. If the description isn’t relevant to the story, I try to avoid it.

Have any of your characters ever surprised you? Did this change the plot of your book? I’m a pantser so I’d have to say that my characters don’t surprise me. I generally start with an idea, a concept, and then I start writing. The entire thing is somewhat of a surprise for me as a result, which is what helps me write. It’s when I figure out the “rest of the story” when the block settles in because the surprises are over.

What is the most difficult thing you have accomplished in your life? Raising two boys to adulthood. Nothing else compares.

What three events or people have most influenced how you live your life? I can’t deny the influence my parents had. My dad was (still is at the age of 89) a writer. My parents gifted to me a love of reading and my mom has always been one of the biggest fans of my writing. And then there is the birth of those two boys—two little munchkins who changed my life forever.

What would you tell your younger self? Be bolder, don’t be so scared.

Have you ever met up with a bear on a hike? If so, what did you do? If not, are you looking up what to do right now? Great question. No and I hope I never do. Where I hike, I’m more concerned with mountain lions. All I know is “make yourself as large as possible!”

You’re locked in your local library for the night with no dinner. Thank goodness you have water, but you only have enough change to buy one item from the vending machine. Choices are limited to Fudge Pop Tarts, Snickers or Doritos. Which would you choose and why? Totally a Snickers. Brown Sugar Cinnamon Pop Tarts are the only ones worth eating. Doritos are meh. Snickers has everything that makes a candy bar a candy bar.

What’s the largest number of people you’ve had in your kitchen at one time? Probably around 10-12. I make pizza and occasionally have pizza parties. Instead of hanging out elsewhere, most of the attendees like to hang out in the kitchen while I make the pizza.

Closing thoughts: Thanks for giving me this opportunity to share my writing. I’m a big fan of indie writers and think we need to do everything we can to support each other.

Website and social media links:
Blog: kingmidgetramblings.wordpress.com
Website: markpaxson.com
Writers group: writerssupportingwriters.com
Twitter: @mkpaxson


Are you an indie or self-published author?  Do you want to build your author network? Get your name out on Who’s That Indie Author!

Email bvitelli2009@gmail.com for a bio template and other details.

Looking for indie, self-published and hybrid authors – is that you?

Are you an indie, self-published or hybrid author looking for a way to tell the world about your books? Who’s That Indie Author is a great way to introduce yourself to readers. It’s also an opportunity to connect with bloggers and expand your network through connections on WordPress and social media.

Take advantage of a chance to show your talents. Submit an author profile and see your name travel from blog to blog and tweet to tweet! Email Book Club Mom at bvitelli2009@gmail.com.

Check out these recent Who’s That Indie Author profiles:

Geoff Le Pard
Darlene Foster

Christina Consolino
Anne Goodwin
Thomas “Buddy” Bardenwerper
Sheila M. Cronin

If you’ve already been featured on Who’s That Indie Author and you have some news to share, consider submitting an Author Update. Here are some more recent posts:

JP McLean
Bruce W. Bishop
Margie Miklas
Pamela S. Wight
Tammie Painter
B. Lynn Goodwin

For more information, email bvitelli2009@gmail.com.

Thanks for visiting – come back soon!


Who’s That Indie Author? Geoff Le Pard

Author Name: Geoff Le Pard

Genres: magical realism, mystery, relationship, thriller, comedy/coming of age, poetry, anthologies of short fiction, contemporary/ gritty urban and a memoir

Selected Books: Life Sentences (2022); The Art of Spirit Capture (2021); Booms and Busts (2020); Walking into Trouble (2020); Buster and Moo (2017). For more titles visit: geofflepard.com.

Bio: I started writing to entertain in 2006. I haven’t left the keyboard since. When I’m not churning out novels, I write some maudlin self-indulgent poetry, short fiction and blog, I walk the dog for mutual inspiration and most of my best ideas come out of these strolls. I also cook with passion if not precision.

What got you started as a writer? My wife suggested I join her at a summer school where she was taking a printing class. We ballroom danced in the morning and, in the afternoon, while she printed I took a creative writing class.

What is your writing routine? Mostly I start writing from about 4 pm, stop to cook dinner and begin again ending at any time between 9.30 pm and 1.00 am. I try and write daily

What route did you take to get your books published? I briefly flirted with approaching agents but thought better of it. I didn’t want to delay; I didn’t want to be told to make major revisions that I might well not agree with. Self-publishing is so straightforward these days I thought, why not go that route. Publishing has not been about kudos or sales but to stop myself tinkering with the latest book. Once it is published I leave it alone. Before that I’m always nibbling away at it.

What things do you do to promote your books? A bit on the blog I write. Occasional guest posts and pieces like this.

What is your favorite genre to read and why? Probably crime fiction. I like well plotted books with good characters and intriguing stories. After that it is comic fantasy.

Do you prefer to write dialogue or description? Dialogue

Have any of your characters ever surprised you? Did this change the plot of your book? Every time. It’s true they take over. If you let them into your subconscious they work away at you until you do what you’re told.

What is the most difficult thing you have accomplished in your life? Staying in the same job for thirty-five years—a quite extraordinary example of patience, determination and a supreme lack of imagining alternatives.

What three events or people have most influenced how you live your life? My wife is (and has been since we met in 1976) a constant source of guidance, surprise and ruthless criticism; being able to obtain a high quality and free education right through to my degree that allowed me to become a lawyer in the City of London just when the need for financial legal services exploded in the 1980s; and the example of my parents who combined humour, old fashioned manners, a love of literature and the spoken word, a deep affection, an utterly surreal take on some aspects of life, kindness and a love of cake and gardening.

What would you tell your younger self? Stop worrying and yes, your nose will always look too big.

Have you ever met up with a bear on a hike? If so, what did you do? If not, are you looking up what to do right now? I read A Walk in the Woods by Bill Bryson who has a section on human-ursus interfaces and what to do. My main take away was not to eat Snickers. The nearest bear to me right now is a small statue of my ursine hero Paddington at the station he is name after.

You’re locked in your local library for the night with no dinner. Thank goodness you have water, but you only have enough change to buy one item from the vending machine. Choices are limited to: Fudge Pop Tarts, Snickers or Doritos. Which would you choose and why? Doritos. Pop Tarts are merely jam that has not had the packaging removed; fudge can only be eaten with tea or coffee or my fillings rebel at the excess of sugar and Snickers remind me of Bryson’s advice.

What’s the largest number of people you’ve had in your kitchen at one time? We have had several parties here so we’ve squeezed in a fair number but probably something like the seventy-two teenagers.

Closing thoughts: Having lived to be three score years and five, I have reached a few tentative conclusions about living life well: try most everything once; look up more than down or you will buy too many shoes; outdoors is better than in so long as you wear the right clothing; instant coffee never gets any better; failure is a myth—it’s just another example of ‘not yet’; everything will be alright in the end and if it’s not yet alright, it’s not yet the end; and there’s good in everyone.

Website and social media links:
Blog: TanGental
Twitter: @geofflepard
Facebook: Geoff Le Pard
Instagram: geofflepard1


Are you an indie or self-published author?  Do you want to build your author network? Get your name out on Who’s That Indie Author!

Email bvitelli2009@gmail.com for a bio template and other details.

Who’s That Indie Author? Christina Consolino

Christina Consolino

Author Name: Christina Consolino

Genre: Women’s Fiction with romantic elements

Book: Rewrite the Stars

Bio: Christina Consolino is a writer and editor whose debut novel, Rewrite the Stars, placed as a finalist for the Ohio Writers’ Association Great Novel Contest 2020 and the 2021 Best Book Awards. She serves as senior editor at the online journal Literary Mama, freelance edits both fiction and nonfiction, and teaches writing classes at Word’s Worth Writing Center. She lives in Ohio with her husband, four children, and a rotating cast of pets.

What got you started as a writer? Writing is something I have always wanted to do, and when my children were little, I blogged (mostly to appease the little voice inside that kept telling me to write). When that voice changed to a character prodding me to tell their story, I took up the call to write. That was a decade ago.

What is your writing routine? After the alarm rings at 5:15 a.m., I grab my computer, coffee, and water, and I sit with my cats in the dining room as I work. I can get about an hour of work in before my obligations for the day begin, but I try to squeeze in fifteen-minute chunks of writing time in my day. And sometimes, I block off entire days for writing (those seem like gifts!).

What route did you take to get your book published? This book took so long to become the book it is today (eight years), and during that time, my outlook on publishing and what I wanted changed. In the end, I pursued a small publisher because that model would work best for me, my goals, and my family.

What things do you do to promote your book? I can cheerlead anyone else, but when it comes time to cheerlead for myself—I just hate it. But no one will support your work if you don’t, so I do what I can with my limited time, primarily using Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter for posts, and I have been featured on podcasts or in written interviews like this one (thank you so much!).

What is your favorite genre to read and why? I’d have to say women’s fiction with romantic elements (which makes sense, since that’s what I write!). However, with the thriller genre back in favor (or maybe it never left), I’ve realized that I do enjoy a good thriller.

Do you prefer to write dialogue or description? Dialogue!

Have any of your characters ever surprised you? Did this change the plot of your book? I won’t go into the whole story (if you’re interested, you can read about it here), but at one point, Theo (now a POV character in Rewrite the Stars), said to me, “Excuse me? I need to tell my side of the story.” The fact that he wanted to tell his story really surprised me, and I had to perform an entire structural rewrite of the book.

What is the most difficult thing you have accomplished in your life? I got married, got pregnant, and gave birth to twins while in graduate school. That meant that I needed to write a dissertation and defend that dissertation with two infants at home. It took a village, but I did it! Come to find out, that was only slightly more difficult than birthing a book.

What three events or people have most influenced how you live your life? My husband—he’s far more chill than I am, and I’ve learned that there’s no need to worry about most things. My parents—every day I apply what they did or didn’t do to my own situation. My children—they are far wiser about many things, and they teach me something new every day.

What would you tell your younger self? Be confident, be kind, believe in yourself.

Have you ever met up with a bear on a hike? If so, what did you do? If not, are you looking up what to do right now? No. When I visited Sequoia National Park, I was warned of bears, but I did not encounter one. And no, I’m not looking up what to do right now. But I probably should!

You’re locked in your local library for the night with no dinner. Thank goodness you have water, but you only have enough change to buy one item from the vending machine. Choices are limited to: Fudge Pop Tarts, Snickers or Doritos. Which would you choose and why? Being locked in a library sounds divine! And I’d go for the Snickers. That little bit of protein from the peanuts would keep me more satisfied than the others!

What’s the largest number of people you’ve had in your kitchen at one time? Twenty.

Closing thoughts: Thank you so much for having me! I love hearing from readers and writers, so feel free to reach out to me via any of the venues listed below!

Website and social media links:
Website: christinaconsolino.com
Twitter: @cmconsolino
Instagram: @cmconsolino
Facebook: @AuthorChristinaConsolino


Are you an indie or self-published author?  Do you want to build your author network? Get your name out on Who’s That Indie Author!

Email bvitelli2009@gmail.com for a bio template and other details.

Who’s That Indie Author? A new look and new questions!

Who’s That Indie Author has a new look and updated interview questions. If you are an indie or self-published author and would like to be featured, email bvitelli2009@gmail.com for a bio template and other details.

Who’s That Indie Author – share your writing story!

Thanks for visiting – come back soon!

Who’s That Indie Author? Anne Goodwin

Anne Goodwin

Author Name: Anne Goodwin

Genre: Literary/reading group fiction

Books: Sugar and Snails (novel, 2015); Underneath (novel, 2017); Becoming Someone (short stories, 2018); Matilda Windsor Is Coming Home (novel, 2021)

Brief bio: Anne Goodwin writes entertaining fiction about identity, mental health and social justice and is the author of three novels and a short story collection published by small independent press, Inspired Quill. Her debut novel, Sugar and Snails, was shortlisted for the 2016 Polari First Book Prize. Her new novel, Matilda Windsor Is Coming Home, is inspired by her previous incarnation as a clinical psychologist in a long-stay psychiatric hospital.

What got you started as a writer? I’d written since childhood, but was too shy to share the results with anyone but my sister, although I did win a national student writing competition in my late teens. Later, I was too busy writing reports and academic papers for fiction. When a family tragedy sparked a midlife crisis, my therapist (see next answer) urged me to consider what I wanted for myself. It was the prompt I needed to make space for my hitherto secret ambition to become a published author.

What difficult experience has helped you as a writer? The complicated bereavement forced me to take my writing seriously. Plus, several years of psychotherapy helped me mine the depths of childhood trauma and to accept it, however painful, as part of who I am. I believe my fiction benefits from this meticulous processing: I can delve into characters’ challenging emotions without my own issues contaminating the story.

Have you ever participated in the National Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo)? If so, how many times and what was your experience? Not officially, as the pace is too fast for me, but I’ve started a new novel in November a couple of times, averaging 1000 words a day to complete a draft before the end of January. However, contrary to most advice to hare through the first draft to have something to edit, I remain a contented tortoise.

What advice would you give a new indie author hoping to publish a book? Set up your author newsletter early, preferably before you publish.

What has been the biggest challenge for you during Covid? Tolerating the UK government’s mismanagement, especially in relation to PPE shortages, neglect of care homes and apparent indifference to higher death rates among people of colour. But it’s catalysed my next novel about a care home resident with delusions of grandeur who becomes convinced she’s responsible for the transatlantic slave trade.

What are you reading right now? The Promise by Damon Galgut, winner of the 2021 Booker prize.

Would you rather laugh or cry over a book? As in life, I value both.

Have you ever climbed a tree to read a book?  Not that I can remember, although I have read in a hammock hanging from a tree. (Make that two trees.)

Have you ever dropped a book in the tub, in a pool or in the ocean? Books are far too precious to read where there’s risk of damage.

Could you live in a tiny house? A tiny house is far preferable to no house, so yes, of course. But, as I live in a larger-than-average house at the moment, I’m not looking forward to downsizing.

What are the small things that make you happy? Butterflies, the first snowdrops, a surprise sight of deer on my morning walk. Choral singing, cuddling up with my husband, cuddling up with a book. Connecting with readers, learning new words, a fresh insight into my WIP. Moorland, spectacular sunsets, lentil soup.

Website and social media links:
Website annegoodwin.weebly.com
Book blog Annecdotal
Facebook @Annecdotist
Instagram authorannegoodwin
Twitter @Annecdotist
YouTube Anne Goodwin’s YouTube channel


Are you an indie or self-published author?  Do you want to build your author network? Get your name out on Who’s That Indie Author!

Email bvitelli2009@gmail.com for a bio template and other details.

Who’s That Indie Author? Thomas “Buddy” Bardenwerper

Author Name: Thomas “Buddy” Bardenwerper

Genre: Commercial fiction

Books: Mona Passage: A Novel

Brief bio: After college, I served as a Coast Guard officer aboard cutters homeported in Maine and Puerto Rico. In 2018, I was medically retired for Type 1 diabetes but was fortunate to transition to Harvard Law School on the GI Bill. My wife, one-year-old daughter, and I will be moving to Miami after I graduate this spring.

What got you started as a writer? The diabetes diagnosis, actually. Suddenly I had all of this free time because the Coast Guard wouldn’t let me go to sea. I started writing as a way to process these changes in my life, and before I knew it this story about Galán, Gabriela, and Pat came to me, a story that needed to be told.

What difficult experience has helped you as a writer? Participating in the Coast Guard’s migrant repatriation mission. This is difficult, complicated, and emotionally fraught work. I was determined to finish Mona Passage – and find it a home with a publisher – because readers needed to know about the human drama that unfolds on the Caribbean Sea every day.

Have you ever participated in the National Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo)? If so, how many times and what was your experience? No, and I had never heard of it until now! Very cool – but 50,000 words in one month is no joke!

What advice would you give a new indie author hoping to publish a book? Don’t get wrapped around the axle trying to get an agent. Getting an agent is an arbitrary gatekeeping mechanism, and without a traditional writing pedigree, it’s almost impossible. Instead, look for smaller independent publishers, including those associated with universities like my beloved Syracuse University Press!

What has been the biggest challenge for you during Covid? Seeing my ten nieces and nephews miss out on so much of what makes childhood special.

What are you reading right now? Rum Punch by Elmore Leonard. I love the dialogue and South Florida setting.

Would you rather laugh or cry over a book? Preferably both. But if I had to choose, I’d rather laugh. Too much sentimentality can throw me for a loop!

Have you ever climbed a tree to read a book? I can’t say I have! But I did a lot of reading on my rooftop in San Juan.

Have you ever dropped a book in the tub, in a pool or in the ocean? No, but I’ve done a lot of reading at sea. Before heading out for a sixty-day patrol, I would stuff my sea bag with as many books as possible and see if I could finish the whole lot before coming home.

Could you live in a tiny house? If it has a yard, absolutely! I love getting outside to play with my daughter and workout, bookended by coffee in the mornings and cold beers in the evenings.

What are the small things that make you happy? Watching my daughter learn new words and animal noises.

Website and social media links:
Website: thomasbardenwerper.com
Facebook: Thomas Bardenwerper
Instagram: tbardenwerper89
Twitter: @TBardenwerper89


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